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Odds & Ends: Glenn Close to Revisit Sunset Boulevard & More

first_img Glenn Close View Comments Star Files John Lithgowcenter_img Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today.Glenn Close to Revisit Sunset Boulevard at the Hollywood BowlBefore Glenn Close finds a world to rediscover on Broadway in A Delicate Balance, she is first going to be revisiting a famous number from the role that won her one of her three Tonys. The star will appear on July 8 at the Hollywood Bowl with Joshua Bell and the Los Angeles Philharmonic and sing Sunset Bouelvard’s “As if We Never Said Goodbye.”Diane Keaton May Sing at Cafe CarlyleDiane Keaton is eyeing a new gig: performing a few numbers at one of her ex-boyfriend’s favorite hangouts, the Cafe Carlyle. Showbiz 411 reports that the Oscar winner, soon to be seen singing with a jazz band in Rob Reiner’s movie And So It Goes (which also features Rocky’s Andy Karl), has been approached to headline at the venue and is open to the idea. Watch this space!Taye Diggs Will Appear on The Good WifeBroadway vet Taye Diggs has landed a role on the upcoming sixth season of CBS’ The Good Wife. According to E! News the Rent and Wicked alum will guest star as someone called Dean Levine-Wilkins in multiple episodes. His character is “meticulous” and “talented.” Of course he is.John Lithgow’s a Serial Lunch DaterJohn Lithgow is a man after our own hearts. Or should that be stomachs? Anyway, the Tony winner, soon to be seen in A Delicate Balance with the aforementioned Ms. Close, believes that “rehearsing…is only part of the process. Lunch is big too.” Lithgow, who is currently working on King Lear, wrote in The New York Times how he has taken to lunching with “each actor I have a particularly strong relationship” in the play, including co-star Annette Bening. The result? “…is it just my imagination, or have our scenes together begun to take on a depth they didn’t have before? Who knows?” We can’t wait to see the results! Andy Karllast_img read more

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Tickets Now On Sale to See Off-Broadway’s Man from Nebraska

first_img Star Files Related Shows Man From Nebraska Reed Birney(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) Show Closed This production ended its run on March 26, 2017center_img Tickets are now available to catch Tony winner Reed Birney in Tracy Letts’ Man from Nebraska off-Broadway. Helmed by David Cromer, the play will also feature Oscar nominee Annette O’Toole, stepping in for J. Smith-Cameron who, as previously reported, has departed the off-Broadway staging due to scheduling conflicts. The Second Stage production will begin performances at the Tony Kiser Theatre on January 26, 2017.The play, which was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2004, follows Ken (Birney), a middle aged man from Nebraska (as the title suggests), who embarks on a quest for a meaningful existence after losing his faith and sense of purpose.Joining Birney and O’Toole on stage will be Heidi Armbruster, Tom Bloom, Annika Boras, Nana Mensah, Max Gordon Moore, Kathleen Peirce and William Ragsdale. Opening night is scheduled for February 15, 2017. View Comments Reed Birneylast_img read more

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U.S., Dominican Republic agents seize 2,000 pounds of cocaine

first_img SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic – Dominican and United States counter-narcotics agents seized nearly 2,000 pounds of cocaine in the second major maritime drug seizure in less than a week near a small Caribbean bay. The Dominican National Directorate for Drug Control (DNCD), Air Force, Navy and National Police worked with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and Coast Guard to seize 900 kilograms (1,984.2 pounds) of cocaine that drug traffickers threw off a go-fast boat, authorities said Jan. 14. The boat, likely coming from Colombia, was en route to Ocoa Bay, a quiet fishing area on the country’s southern coastline, west of the capital, Santo Domingo, the DNCD said in a prepared statement. DEA agents spotted the boat in the early morning of Jan. 13 and notified Dominican authorities, who responded by sending three Super Tucano aircraft, a helicopter and four military boats. Authorities said the suspected drug traffickers dumped 36 bales of cocaine in international waters about 70 nautical miles south of Dominican soil. The U.S. Coast Guard recovered the narcotics and sent them to be processed in Puerto Rico. A Coast Guard spokesman said the shipment was still being evaluated and declined to provide additional details. Dominican authorities continued pursuing the 40-foot, Colombian-made Eduardaño-brand boat for several hours and dozens of nautical miles. The suspects, however, turned back toward international waters and escaped. “They decided to throw the cocaine shipment in the water, comprising 36 bales – each one containing between 25 and 30 packets – with each [bale] weighing between 25 and 30 pounds,” the DNCD said in a prepared statement. “In total, there were between 800 and 900 packets of the drugs.” The shipment was the second major bust to take place in the same area in less than a week. On Jan. 9, the three Dominican military agencies teamed with U.S. agencies to seize 1,870 kilograms (4,122.6 pounds) of cocaine near the same bay. Authorities arrested four men in that case, including former Navy Lt. José Luis Arias Cornelio. Arias allegedly was tied to the group trying to bring the narcotics into the country. That shipment also likely was coming from Colombia or Venezuela, authorities said. They called the seizure “a significant blow” to drug trafficking and a win for Operation Sea Wall in which U.S. agencies are partnering with Caribbean authorities to cut down drug shipments. The DNCD praised the success of recent missions, including one in 2012 in which Dominican authorities seized a record amount of cocaine, and pledged to continue working side-by-side with U.S. counterparts. “We also count on the help of anti-narcotics agencies in Colombia and the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and those of Puerto Rico that allow us to have total control of our air and maritime space in confronting the grave threat these enormous drug shipments that we’re seizing represent,” the DNCD said in a prepared statement. [DNCD (Dominican Republic), 14/01/2013; La Prensa Gráfica (El Salvador), 14/01/2013; El Espectador (Mexico), 14/01/2013] By Dialogo January 16, 2013last_img read more

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Shannan Gilbert May Have Been Murdered, 2nd Autopsy Shows

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A New Jersey woman who authorities were searching for when they discovered the Long Island Serial Killer’s dumping ground may have been murdered, contrary to Suffolk County investigators’ findings, her family’s attorney said.Shannan Gilbert, a sex worker who was reported missing in May 2010 and found dead near her last client’s Oak Beach home 20 months later, appears to have been choked to death, according to a second autopsy performed by Dr. Michael Baden, a retired New York City coroner and current Fox News Channel contributor.“There is insufficient information to determine a definite cause of death, but the autopsy findings are consistent with homicidal strangulation,” Baden wrote in the report of his autopsy performed before Gilbert was buried in Amityville last year. His findings are based on two missing “horns” on Gilbert’s u-shaped hyoid bone in her throat.The Suffolk County Medical Examiner’s office had said that her cause and manner of death was “undetermined.” Police have theorized that she was disoriented, wandered into the marsh her last client’s home, and drowned. Authorities have said the client, Joseph Brewer, is not a suspect in her death, but her family suspects that she is a victim of foul play by one of his then-neighbors, Dr. Peter Hackett, who has denied the accusations and since moved.“The police actually refused to pursue the investigation of the death of Shannan Gilbert,” her family’s attorney, John Ray, of Ray, Mitev & Associates, told reporters while flanked by Shannan’s mother and three sisters during a news conference Friday at his Miller Place office. “We think that that position needs to change.”Newly appointed Suffolk County Police Commissioner Timothy Sini announced recently that he is asking the FBI to take a fresh look at the case that Gilbert’s disappearance sparked—the discovery of 10 sets of remains along Ocean Parkway dumped by up to three killers. In response to Ray, Sini said his investigators will review Baden’s findings.Related Story: Red Herrings Among Tips in Serial Killer Case“Suffolk County detectives investigating the Gilgo Beach homicides requested to review the report supporting any contrary conclusion reached by Dr. Michael  Baden, and the department is awaiting documentation,” Sini said in a statement.Later the same day, after receiving a copy of the report, Sini release a second statement.“It provides no additional information, and concludes, as did the Suffolk County Office of the Medical Examiner, that there is insufficient information to determine a definite cause of death,” Sini said.Ray said that he is hopeful that Sini’s tenure will be more helpful than the past two police commissioners that have led the department since the case broke. But Ray said that Homicide Squad detectives still refuse to meet with him and his private investigator to discuss the evidence they’ve collected. Ray noted that the FBI has met with him to discuss the case.Police did not to respond to questions about Ray’s allegations that detectives have told witnesses not to talk to him. Ray noted that, barring a legal challenge from the county, he hopes to acquire the recording of Shannan’s 911 call next week.Shannan’s mother, Mari, said that her daughter did not know how to swim and would not have waded into a marsh on her own. She and her surviving daughters said that their frustration with how the case was handled prompted them to file a lawsuit against police and Hackett.“She was not perfect…but she does not deserve to be forgotten,” Mari said. “There’s too many coincidences to say that they’re not all related.”Suffolk County police ask anyone with information relating to this investigation to call 1-800-220-TIPS or visit www.tipsubmit.com. A $25,000 reward is being offered for information leading to an arrest in the Gilgo Beach murders.last_img read more

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Letters to the Editor for Saturday, Sep. 28

first_imgMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionClimate deniers must recognize scienceIn his Sept. 25 letter, John Gaetani agreed that there was climate change but said he believed that it’s caused by “the sun’s activity and the Earth’s orbit around the sun” rather than human activity.This is what is known in the science trade as a “testable hypothesis.” That is, do measurements show that the energy from the sun has increased over the last hundred years or so and can this account for the warming?The answer is that solar or orbital changes can account for no more than a few percent of global warming. This hypothesis has been tested and has been found wanting.By contrast, the hypothesis that CO2, methane and other human-produced gases are the principal cause of warming has been tested hundreds of times through various calculations, and they have been found to produce the observed warming.If the deniers have another explanation that has survived testing, then they should put it on the table. And don’t dismiss this as “only a model.” Most of science and all of engineering rest on mathematical models.But this is not about science.I once asked a local SUNY scientist and vocal climate change skeptic about what it would take to convince him that human-caused global warming was true. His answer was, “Nothing, really.”That is not skepticism, it is denial. The time has come for the deniers to step aside. We have work to do.James E. PickettNiskayunaMake better use of my tax moneyIt’s time to take the letter C out of FMCC. I graduated from Fulton Montgomery Community College in 1976. It was a college for Fulton and Montgomery county students to better their education.It was for community students.I read recently that FMCC is making an effort to increase international student enrollment. I am a taxpayer in Montgomery county. Why should I have my tax money pay for a person from out of the country? Back some 50 years ago, these colleges were created to provide local people a means to get educated, not for foreigners or even out-of-region people to take advantage of the system. Either take the “C” out or stop paying for it with my tax dollars.Also, I believe the county tax budget is up to $120 million, up from $90 million, when supposedly it will save money with legislators and a county executive. It’s not working.So I guess go back to the old system with supervisors and a chairman. It seems like it was cheaper.Sandy “Rogo” RoginskiAmsterdamlast_img read more

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France boss Didier Deschamps urges caution with expectations on Arsenal’s Matteo Guendouzi

first_imgAdvertisement France boss Didier Deschamps urges caution with expectations on Arsenal’s Matteo Guendouzi Phil HaighMonday 9 Sep 2019 1:14 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link188Shares Advertisementcenter_img Matteo Guendouzi has earned a lot of plaudits (Picture: AFP/Getty Images)Matteo Guendouzi has earned plenty of plaudits in recent weeks, but his France manager, Didier Deschamps, has urged caution with the 20-year-old sensation.The Arsenal midfielder has started all four of the Gunners’ Premier League games so far this season and has become a key part of Unai Emery’s plans at the Emirates.So impressive have been his performances that he earned his first call-up to the France national team during the current international break.Guendouzi was an unused substitute for the world champions against Albania on Saturday and, although he is a big fan of the youngster, Deschamps believes expectations should be tempered at this stage of his career.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENT‘Do not ask too much, he’s a young player, who is still the Espoirs (under-21) generation, who plays a lot of matches with Arsenal where there is strong competition,’ Deschamps said ahead of the Albania match, via Foot Mercato.‘He’s the modern midfielder, box to box as they say there, with a lot of power and technical quality too. He’s there. What I expect from young people is that they bring this freshness, this dynamism.‘He is a very young player but with a very big potential.’More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityGuendouzi earned special praise for his performance in the north London derby, breaking up play impressively and displaying an excellent range of passing and incredible vision.Former Tottenham striker Darren Bent told Football Insider after the match: ‘He’s playing like he’s someone who’s played for Arsenal for years.‘It’s scary that he’s only 20, he could be in the Arsenal midfield for the next 10 years, he’s really good in that role.Stan Collymore chimed in, telling the Mirror: ‘I said last season that Matteo Guendouzi can go on and be whatever he wants to be in the Premier League.‘And his performance in the north London derby on Sunday only served to reaffirm that belief. He has the ability, the vision and the awareness.‘And if he stays at Arsenal and they build around him, putting someone with more discipline than Granit Xhaka and someone else who is physically bigger the Lucas Torreira alongside him, then we could see the growth of a superstar in front of our eyes.’The man himself has credited Arsenal boss Unai Emery with his impressive progress, saying: ‘Whether it’s defensively, with the ball and without it, the manager wanted me to work on a lot of things.‘At a tactical level, I felt I progressed a lot. I managed to make myself important in the team.‘It’s something I really wanted to do. The manager told me he knew that I would be a key part of his team this year. That’s what I’ve managed to do so far.’MORE: Unai Emery wanted to pick Nacho Monreal in Arsenal starting XI for north London derbyMORE: Arsenal star Granit Xhaka reveals he’s been suffering with Achilles injury after Switzerland clash Commentlast_img read more

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Danica profit up sharply in first half as guarantee-related capital needs shrink

first_imgDanica Pension reported a steep rise in its pre-tax profits for the first half of this year to DKK915m (€123m) from DKK82m, benefiting this year from having to use less funds to back its pension guarantees.The significant increase in pre-tax profits stemmed from the fact only DKK82m was transferred in the six months to the end of June, compared with DKK645m in the same period in 2013, it said in its interim report.This was because it had been possible to recognise a greater share of the risk premium from the traditional with-profits business in the first half of 2014 than had been the case in the first half of 2013, it said.Another factor behind the increase in pre-tax profit was growth in the investment return on equity, with this return rising to DKK238m from DKK69m.  Contributions in the core Danish market increased by more than 9% to DKK10.3bn.Per Klitgård, chief executive of the Danske-Bank subsidiary, said: “This reflects an increase both in corporate and private customers.”He said the subsidiary’s cooperation with Danske Bank was developing very satisfactorily, with contributions through the bank rising by 43% between the first half 2013 and the latest reporting period.The total return on customer funds in the traditional with-profits business segment climbed to 6.7% at the end of June, up from the 1.2% loss reported for the same period last year.The return on unit-link pensions, meanwhile, was 5.7% on average in the first half.Contributions overall rose to DKK14.4bn from DKK14bn, while total assets increased to DKK344m from DKK321m by the end of June 2014.last_img read more

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American exceptionalism: CalPERS gets tough on managers

first_imgChristopher O’Dea explores whether CalPERS’s decision to sack half of its fund managers illustrates a broader trend in the institutional marketThe decision by the largest US public sector employee pension fund to sack as many as half its investment managers demonstrates that the struggle by large public pension plans to earn enough to pay benefits has entered a new phase – and public plan officials are telling investment managers they’ll have to accept lower fees before officials ask beneficiaries to make larger contributions or accept reduced benefits.CalPERS, the California Public Employees’ Retirement System, will direct its investment board at its June meeting next week to reduce the number of direct relationships with private equity, real estate and other external investment managers to 100 from 212. A public announcement is slated for Monday.The move is aimed at reducing the fees CalPERS paid to external managers last year. That may seem to be pocket change for CalPERS, which has assets of more than $305bn (€270bn). But analysts say the pension fund, like many US plans, is facing a reckoning that stems from the uniquely US system of discounting pension plan liabilities with the assumed rate of return on assets. According to Andrew Biggs of the American Enterprise Institute, US pension plans assume an average 7.75% return on their investments, while pension consultants and investment managers say the median projected return over the next 10 years for a pension plan with 70% in equities is just 5.9%. Assuming lofty returns makes it appear that pension plans’ investment returns will be able to cover payments to retirees. But CalPERS will soon face a duration problem – that is, the increase in its benefit payments will exceed the increase in its asset value from investment activity. “Benefit payments plus operating expenses are starting to exceed net investment income plus contributions,” says David Crane, lecturer on public policy and research scholar at the Stanford University Institute for Economic Policy Research.Investing costs are number eight on the 10-item Investment Beliefs list CalPERS adopted in 2013, which calls for the fund to use its size to gain negotiating leverage to reduce costs and retain a larger share of economic profits from investing. A former member of the Volcker State Budget Crisis Task Force and the American Society of Actuaries’ Blue Ribbon Panel on the Causes of Public Pension Underfunding, Crane expects more plans will follow CalPERS and look to cut fees to investment managers as a way to help close funding shortfalls, and thereby avoid – or at least forestall – the need to raise participant contributions or cut benefits.“Pension funds are increasingly asking governments to make up for shortfalls, which in turn forces those governments to cut spending on public services or raise taxes, or both,” says Crane. “The more pension funds can improve net investment income, the less pressure they need to put on governments to cut services or raise taxes. One way to improve net investment income is to reduce fees.”CalPERS’s move illustrates a broader trend in the institutional market, according to Stephen Ellis, a director at Morningstar Equity Research. Pension funds and other institutional investors “are generally seeking to cull their list”, he says in a report on The Carlyle Group LP. “Some institutional investors may have hundreds of managers to oversee, which means substantial monitoring expenses, and funds want to reduce oversight costs.” The trend favours large managers with diverse strategy offerings, Ellis says, as pension funds today “generally prefer to place funds with established managers where they have existing limited partner relationships”.A CalPERS spokesman confirmed that eliminating some external managers will help the fund improve its overall economic position. Last year, it paid external investment managers $1.6bn, $400m of which was a one-­time payment to certain real estate managers, according to a CalPERS spokesman. In a conference call about the matter, CalPERS CIO Theodore Eliopoulos said the fund was “taking the next step in what we see as a multi-year effort to reduce risk, cost and complexity so we can deliver the investment returns that are necessary to meet our obligations”.For more on CalPERS and fees, see the July issue of IPE magazinelast_img read more

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​AP7, Church of England PF back tool to probe climate lobbying

first_imgAP7, the Church of England Pensions Board and BNP Paribas Asset Management (BNPP AM) are linking up with a consultancy to create a framework for investors to evaluate the climate friendliness of lobbying practices carried out by investee firms.The three investors and specialist firm Chronos Sustainability said the framework was being developed this year to assess whether and to what extent corporate lobbying was aligned with the goals of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.Charlotta Dawidowski Sydstrand, sustainability strategist at the Swedish national pension fund AP7, said: “There is an urgent need for action to address climate change risks as a material investment issue for current and future generations.She said the SEK674bn (€64bn) pension fund had found that weaknesses in current climate policy globally posed a risk to the long-term value growth of its pension portfolios. “We find it unacceptable that at this point in time companies still counteract ambitious climate policy, either directly or through their business organisations,” Dawidowski Sydstrand said.Chronos Sustainability said the project would identify ways in which firms influenced the policy-making process around climate-related regulations, and whether firms supported or attempted to hinder this.It would compare corporate practices and recommend how investors should manage such companies, the firm said.Clare Richards, senior engagement manager at the Church of England Pensions Board, said misleading corporate lobbying practices undermined government action on climate change.“The stakes are high, and it is right that investors are working with and challenging companies to clean up their lobbying activities and demonstrate better practice,” she said.Chronos Sustainability said it had seen improvement in this area over the past year, with many firms agreeing to review their own climate lobbying practices in response to shareholder concerns.Some companies undertaking to do this acknowledged that improved lobbying practices provided better value for them in the long term, the advisory firm said.“We are championing this research project in order to provide greater understanding of what good practice looks like when it comes to lobbying on climate issues,” said AP7’s Dawidowski Sydstrand.Chronos Sustainability said it intended to have the framework ready by this autumn, with a view to it feeding into investors’ plans for next year.Last week, think tank Preventable Surprises announced the launch of the Corporate Lobbying Alignment Project (CLAP). Developed by the group, the project aimed to enable investors to “take on” corporate lobbying systematically.The think tank’s CEO Jérôme Tagger said corporate influence could be a major cause of the lack of progress on many systemic environmental and social risks, derailing any attempted action by regulators which was based on evidence or the public interest.Looking for IPE’s latest magazine? Read the digital edition here.last_img read more

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Pregnancy iron cuts small baby risk

first_img Share Sharing is caring! HealthLifestyle Pregnancy iron cuts small baby risk by: – June 21, 2013 Women in low-income countries are particularly at risk from iron deficiency during pregnancyTaking daily iron supplements during pregnancy can reduced the chances of having a small baby as well as anaemia, says research from Harvard University.Studies of two million women found that taking even a tiny amount of iron cut the risk of anaemia by 12% and low birth weight by 3%.Pregnant women in the UK are not given iron supplements unless their iron levels are found to be low.Serious iron deficiency tends to affect women in poorer countries.The British Medical Journal study analysed the results of more than 90 randomised trials and studies involving pregnant women in countries including China and Tanzania.For every additional 10mg of iron taken each day, up to a maximum of 66mg per day, the risks of anaemia and low birth weight decreased, the study said.Birth weight was found to increase by 15g with each 10mg of iron taken per day.But researchers found no reduction in the risk of premature birth as a result of iron use.Previous studies have suggested there could be a higher risk of low birth weight and premature birth in pregnant women with anaemia.The study says iron deficiency is the most common cause of anaemia during pregnancy, especially in low and middle income countries, affecting about 32 million pregnant women in 2011.The study authors are calling for improved antenatal care in countries where iron deficiency is common and say future research should look at “feasible strategies of iron delivery”.The World Health Organization currently recommends a dose of 60mg per day for pregnant women.Dr Batool Haider, study author from the department of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard University’s school of public health, said even high-income countries could take something from the research.“The recently estimated prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia during pregnancy in Europe was estimated to be 16.2% in 2011,” she said.NICE guidelines, however, say that iron supplements should not be offered routinely to all pregnant women in the UK.Janet Fyle, professional policy adviser at the Royal College of Midwives, said ensuring pregnant women had the right level of iron was important.“Women’s iron levels are checked at specific times during pregnancy. Appropriate action is taken if required, such as dietary advice or an iron supplement may be recommended. “There is perhaps a need here in the UK for us to focus on ensuring better pre-conception health, so that women contemplating pregnancy can adjust their diet to include appropriate nutrients before becoming pregnant.”She added: “The problem of serious iron deficiency tends to affect low income countries, where some women may already have poor health status before pregnancy and have the added burden of not being able to afford iron supplements.” Dr Roger Marwood, consultant obstetrician and spokesman for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, said the effects of iron on pregnant women in low and high income countries in the study were hard to ignore.“This large study shows all the signs of there being a real effect – and it shows that even low doses can have a significant effect.”He said women who are intolerant to iron can suffer from indigestion, bloating and other stomach problems. But reducing the dose should also reduce the side effects.Dr Sue Pavord, consultant haematologist at University Hospitals of Leicester, said the study provided compelling evidence for the benefits of iron supplementation on foetal growth. Up until now, the evidence has been inconclusive.She said: “It’s not clear whether such big effects will be seen in the UK population and whether routine supplementation for all women will be better than our current approach, which is prompt identification and management of at risk groups. “But in the light of this new data we will be reviewing this.”BBC News 19 Views   no discussionscenter_img Share Tweet Sharelast_img read more

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