xwsxcbff

xwsxcbff

Sister Spotlight: Sister Joanne Becker recalls her experience in the congregation, at the College

first_imgEditor’s Note: Sister Spotlight is an effort by the Saint Mary’s News Department to shed light on the shared experience of the Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross and Saint Mary’s students. We will be sharing the mission and stories of the sisters in an on-going series.It was Labor Day of 1961 when Sister Joanne Becker boarded a train to Notre Dame to enter the convent of the Sisters of the Holy Cross. A native of Maryland who attended the Academy of the Holy Cross where the Sisters taught, Becker always enjoyed being active.“I was involved in basketball,” she said. “We had a sodality that honored the Blessed Mother and I was the prefect my senior year. The prefect was automatically May Queen. I used to go to the Smithsonian Institute to the old buildings. We’d take a bus and I would just like to spend time there. I don’t know when they started doing those huge fireworks in D.C. but I remember one summer my boyfriend and I had a picnic and saw the fireworks in downtown D.C.”Despite her love for the activities that a large city affords, Becker had no qualms about living in South Bend. “I was part of CSMC — Catholic Student Mission Crusade — and several of us came from the Academy one year to Notre Dame for conference meetings,” she said. “My big attraction was to come over here to Saint Mary’s and see what the convent looked like.”While her parents and boyfriend were less than pleased at her decision to become a Sister of the Holy Cross, Becker was convinced that this was her vocation.“I applied to enter the convent in August of my senior year and I heard nothing until March 17, and then I got my acceptance letter,” Becker said. ”I remember we were doing a musical production at the Academy at the time and I was happy that I could tell all of my friends that I had been accepted.”Becker, along with 10 of her classmates, journeyed to South Bend that fall to enter the convent.“It was just exciting,” she said. ”I was young and there was a group of us that came from my high school. I was getting on a train to come somewhere I had been before. I was excited. We all were excited.”Friendships continued to be an important part of Becker’s life throughout her time as a Sister of the Holy Cross. “The best part of my life was Sister Arlene,” Becker said. ”We met while we were both teaching at Holy Cross grade school. Neither of us had a sister so we adopted each other as sisters. We shared our families.”Their travels during their summer holidays took the two sisters across the United States.“Sometimes we would take stops on the way. We stopped in Hershey, Pennsylvania one time on our way back East,” she said. “One time we flew to California. We have a retirement home in Ventura and so we spent 10 days with our sisters there and just did some great things. We visited some of the missions.”Despite being diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at the age of 25, Becker maintained an active teaching life, teaching in grade schools throughout Virginia, Texas and Indiana. As her condition required her to work part time, Becker began doing library work in Illinois and then became the librarian at Holy Cross before accepting her current position as congregational archivist at Saint Mary’s. During her time as a math and science teacher in Texas, Becker remembers the moon landing of 1969. “That was a big thing,” she said. “We all watched that on TV. The students were all really excited. I don’t think they could have really appreciated it. I don’t even know that I really appreciated it. It was marvelous. It was exciting.”However, this wasn’t the only historical event that made an impression on Becker.“I think the thing that I remember most is when Kennedy was assassinated,” Becker said. ”I was in a stairway in Le Mans Hall when somebody said what had happened. That was on a Friday. I was still in formation and we hardly ever watched TV but we watched the whole thing.”Becker’s many stories of friendship and teaching testify to the beauty of wholeheartedly living out one’s vocation.“There have been hard times, but then there are wonderful times,” she said. “I loved what I did and it’s been truly wonderful.”Tags: Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross, sister joanne becker, sister spotlight, Sisters of the Holy Crosslast_img read more

Read More

xwsxcbff

Berger urges CFPB privacy notice clarification

first_imgA recent statutory change on privacy notice requirements should be backed up with a statement or interim rule from CFPB to ensure clarity in regulatory guidance, NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger said in a letter Friday to CFPB Director Richard Cordray.“The new statutory exemption to the annual privacy notice requirements will provide a significant number of credit unions with regulatory relief by allowing them to avoid expending the costs and resources associated with distributing redundant annual notices,” Berger wrote. “In addition, the elimination of duplicative annual notices will reduce the likelihood of consumer confusion.” continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Read More

xwsxcbff

CUNA suggests improvements to Fed card issuer survey

first_imgThe Federal Reserve Board should develop a card issuer survey that completely and accurately captures issuer cost data related to electronic debit transactions, CUNA wrote to the board this week. Along with several other trade organizations, CUNA’s letter requests such a survey, one that does not place a unique burden on those required to complete it.The Federal Reserve Board issued a series of questions and proposed revisions for public comment regarding the biannual debit card issuer survey the board uses to facilitate its administration of the Electronic Fund Transfer Act and the related Board regulation.“The issuer survey is an important tool for the Board in fulfilling its ongoing obligations,” the letter reads. “We believe that there would be substantial benefit to the board, debit card issuers, and the debit card marketplace if the issuer survey was revised as recommended in this letter.” continue reading » 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Read More

xwsxcbff

Health tourism experts say Croatia is ready for post-COVID patients

first_imgThe focus of this year’s conference was on how the pandemic affects health tourism, ie the current market situation, new practices and opportunities in the field of health travel, and in the field of promotion and communication, as well as what can be expected in the future. that is, in the so-called post-COVID period. The Crikvenica Conference on Health Tourism was again successfully organized this year by the Tourist Board of the City of Crikvenica and the Kvarner Health Tourism Cluster, and the co-organizers were Thalassotherapia Crikvenica and the Terme Selce Polyclinic. The conference has traditionally been supported by the Ministry of Tourism and Sports, the Ministry of Health, the Primorje-Gorski Kotar County, the Kvarner Tourist Board, the Croatian Chamber of Commerce and the City of Crikvenica.   Already in the first two days of the conference, it achieved over three thousand views. “It is extremely important to promote the possibilities and quality of health tourism in Kvarner, but also in the whole of Croatia, through such international conferences. I believe that in the future, health tourism will become one of the most profitable branches of tourism in Croatia”, Said Professor Ivan Đikić. “The strategic focus of Croatia is the further development of our health tourism, which has a great potential to contribute to year-round tourism activity. In addition, Croatia has all the important comparative advantages for this form of tourism, which we will use in the period aheadAnnounced the Minister of Tourism and Sports Nikolina Brnjac, greeting all the organizers, sponsors and participants of the eighth conference on health tourism.  center_img “We are glad that the conference has grown beyond the national framework through this way of presentation, and that we have brought the conference, but also Crikvenica as a health destination, closer to the world. What we knew, and what we have now confirmed, is that it is necessary to work on connecting at all levels, from national to local, in order for Croatia to become a recognizable destination for health tourism. Emphasis should always be placed on the quality of health services, but also on the certification of health institutions, especially in this COVID and post-COVID time, which was emphasized by many panelists at CIHT. Also, additional work should be done on branding Croatia as a destination for health tourism, on which local brands should then rely.”Concluded Marijana Biondić, director of the Tourist Board of the City of Crikvenica and with great optimism invited all participants to the ninth CIHT conference in Kvarner, in Crikvenica on November 4 and 5, 2021. The eighth Crikvenica International Health Tourism Conference was held on November 12 and 13, for the first time virtually in English, and visitors were able to follow it through a special mobile event application, You Tube and Facebook channels. Watch the video of the first and second day of the conference below:last_img read more

Read More

xwsxcbff

Landslide kills two in West Sumatra

first_imgTopics : Dodi said the landslide was caused by the heavy rains that had been falling since Saturday evening.The landslide damaged 10 houses, including four with “severe damage”, with 21 survivors reported. A heavy downpour caused a landslide on Sunday in Guguak Malalo, a collection of villages in Tanah Datar regency, West Sumatra, claiming two lives and destroying homes.The fatal victims have been identified as a 75-year-old woman, Bainar, and her 45-year-old son. Ijun, said emergency head Dodi Susilo of the Tanah Datar Disaster Mitigation Agency.The mother and son were found buried in mud near the ruins of theiir house at around 1:30 p.m., nine hours after the landslide hit the area at 4:30 a.m.last_img read more

Read More

xwsxcbff

Danish, Dutch pensions boast best inflation-adjusted returns since 2008

first_imgDanish and Dutch pension systems have achieved the strongest returns, adjusted for inflation, since the onset of the financial crisis, according to OECD calculations.The majority of OECD countries saw pension funds post positive returns last year, rebounding after nearly two-thirds suffered losses in 2011.According to the latest ’Pension Markets in Focus’ report, pension funds in the 34 OECD countries posted an average return of 5% last year and saw their assets continue to grow, at the end of 2012 accounting for 28% of all institutional holdings across the member states.The report also noted that assets under management at pension funds had risen twice as strongly – by 7.4% since 2009 – than the 3.8% and 3.4% growth seen by the funds industry and insurance industry, respectively, in OECD nations. The report said that, despite continuing uncertainties in the world economy, pension funds averaged 5% investment returns in 2012, a marked improvement over the 2011 results when 21 member states saw their pension funds post losses.“Of these 21 countries, 19 experienced positive returns in 2012,” the report adds. “The UK and US had better returns in 2012, though still negative.”In the Netherlands, where pension assets account for 160% of local GPD, its pension industry saw the highest overall returns of all countries examined, seeing assets return 13.5%.On a ranking of European countries, Belgium came second behind its neighbour, due to pension assets returning 9.3%, followed by 7.9% returns by the Swedish system – with 7.5% and 7.1% from Switzerland and Iceland, respectively.“Sixteen further OECD countries saw real investment rates of returns between 2% and 7%,” the report adds. “The simple average improved by 6.7 percentage points, from -1.8% in 2011 to 4.9% in 2012.”The report also found that, since 2008, 16 member states saw nominal annual rates of return exceed 2%.“Turkey and Denmark came through the global instability with the best results in nominal terms, with a return equal to 11.6% and 8.5%, respectively,” it says.“However, after taking into account inflation, Denmark and the Netherlands are the two countries that performed the best over the period, with a real return equal to 6.1% and 3.5%, respectively.”,WebsitesWe are not responsible for the content of external sitesLink to ‘Pensions in Focus’ reportlast_img read more

Read More

xwsxcbff

Atlantic Refloated off Sweden, Towed to Harbor

first_imgThe cargo ship Atlantic was pulled from its grounding spot off the coast of Oskarshamn on September 27 and towed to a harbor, according to the Swedish Coast Guard.The 3,041 dwt ship suffered hull damage when it got stuck on rocks in the morning hours of September 23 while it was sailing from the port of Visby to Oskarshamn.At the time of the incident, the ship was loaded with 44,000 liters of diesel, 24,000 of which were located near the damaged area and had to be removed in order to avoid a possible oil spill. The ship was earlier reported as taking on water.After the diesel load was extracted, relevant authorities devised a salvage plan for the ship. There were no signs of an oil spill and no reports of injuries to the crew following the incident.Preliminary investigations into the incident suggested that Atlantic’s captain and superintendent showed negligence in maritime traffic, and the two were arrested after the grounding.World Maritime News Staff; Image Courtesy: Swedish Coast Guardlast_img read more

Read More

xwsxcbff

Scholar uses journalistic skills to tell untold story of Caribbean-Americans

first_img Tweet Sharing is caring! Share 20 Views   no discussions Ann-Marie AdamsNEW BRUNSWICK, USA — The former editor of the Hartford Guardian has fused journalism and academic research throughout her career.As a journalist working in Hartford, Connecticut, Ann-Marie Adams was painfully aware that the city’s daily newspapers ignored Hartford’s thriving Caribbean-American community.“Talk about invisibility,” says Adams, whose parents are from Jamaica. “But what struck me was that I didn’t cover the community either, and that’s my heritage. That’s when I took pains to know the Caribbean-American story. It’s an immigrant story that’s mostly untold.”Adams, a post-doctoral fellow and lecturer in the Rutgers University history department, founded The Hartford Guardian, the city’s first hyper-local news website, in 2004 with personal funding and contributions from the city, foundations, and individual donors.Back then, journalists were skeptical that news sites run with public and private grants would work, but Adams and others proved them wrong. The Guardian now gets more than 400,000 hits daily and continues to provide in-depth coverage of the city, with an emphasis on Hartford’s underserved neighborhoods, like “little Jamaica.”“I earned people’s trust and in return they supported me as a social entrepreneur,” says Adams.The Guardian wears its mission on its sleeve: civil rights, “responsible social policy” and stories that help residents access community services, according to the site’s “about” page.“You’re there to advocate for your readers by serving as a watchdog in city hall and the community. That’s the job of a journalist,” says Adams, who will appear at a June 1 New York Times panel on Caribbean-American identity and the media.Caribbean immigrants are hit hard by limited access to aid and information, she says.“Not only are they marginalized from mainstream America; they are also marginalized within the black community,” says Adams. “Just watching them trying to navigate the system was disturbing. I could see how complicated it was for my relatives with children in the school system. They took it for granted that in America, kids would go to school and get a good education. They trusted the system to treat their children well, but found that was not always the case.”Adams says the election of President Obama has focused new attention on black immigrants and what it means to be African-American, a term that in some circles often refers only to descendants of American slaves.Adams, who writes the occasional column for the Guardian, stepped down as editor in 2006 to pursue her doctoral studies at Howard University. She graduated in May 2011 and began as a race and gender postdoctoral associate at Rutgers this past fall. But throughout her career she has fused journalism and academic research.“I started the Hartford Guardian because I saw that as a tool for civic engagement. It’s a bridge from academia to the public,” she says. “With digital technology, I can connect my scholarship with underserved communities.”Adams is revising her dissertation for her first book, about a 1996 Connecticut Supreme Court case in which judges ruled that the state unintentionally segregated schools. The book, “Silent Cries: The Story of Sheff vs. O’Neill,” argues that Connecticut was complicit in segregation efforts by continuing to enforce regulations like an early 20th-century law that prohibited city students from crossing over municipal lines to attend suburban schools. Many other states have county school systems.Similar laws resulted in the arrest last year of a Connecticut woman charged with “stealing” educational services after sending her 6-year-old son to school. Such regulations, which exacerbate Connecticut’s widening student achievement gap, are descended from so-called “black laws” of the 19th century, when blacks were prohibited from crossing municipal and state lines, according to Adams.As part of her research, Adams uses her skills as a reporter to shed light on the history of Caribbean immigrants. Although they have been in the US since the 17th century, their experiences have often been subsumed by the broader story of blacks in America.“I was interviewing older people about the 1940s and 1950s and asked them what it was like in terms of racial solidarity. They said, ‘oh, we were all black back then,’” she says.But the election of President Obama focused new attention on black immigrants and what it means to be “African American,” a term that in some circles often refers only to descendants of American slaves, Adams says.Many Americans of Caribbean descent are now more vocal about their heritage, and it’s more common for celebrities like Nikki Minaj, who emigrated from Trinidad as a child, and Rihanna, who moved to the US from Barbados, to show pride in their Caribbean roots.“Black immigrants have realized that their own heritage has been folded into the larger African-American story, and their contributions to American society are obscured,” says Adams. “Now, they refuse to be silenced.”By Carrie StetlerCaribbean News Nowcenter_img Share NewsRegional Scholar uses journalistic skills to tell untold story of Caribbean-Americans by: – April 7, 2012 Sharelast_img read more

Read More

xwsxcbff

No increase in license cost for next season

first_imgVINTON, Iowa – The cost of an IMCA competitor’s license will remain unchanged for the 13th consecutive season in 2015. Licenses will run $115 for Modifieds, $135 for Late Models, $105 for Sprint Cars, $95 for Stock Cars, $90 for both SportMod divisions, $85 for Hobby Stocks and $60 for Sport Compacts. Optional associate/crew member licenses are also unchanged at $60. IMCA will not administer the West Coast Super Stock program next year. The same insurance coverage remains in effect. A subscription to Inside IMCA is included with license purchase. The 2015 license application form is published on Page A21 in this month’s newsletter. It will also be available online.last_img read more

Read More

xwsxcbff

February 19, 2019 Police Blotter

first_imgFebruary 19, 2019 Police Blotter021919 Ripley County Police Blotter021919 Decatur County EMS Report021919 Decatur County Jail Report021919 Decatur County Fire Report021919 Decatur County Law Reportlast_img

Read More