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No increase in license cost for next season

first_imgVINTON, Iowa – The cost of an IMCA competitor’s license will remain unchanged for the 13th consecutive season in 2015. Licenses will run $115 for Modifieds, $135 for Late Models, $105 for Sprint Cars, $95 for Stock Cars, $90 for both SportMod divisions, $85 for Hobby Stocks and $60 for Sport Compacts. Optional associate/crew member licenses are also unchanged at $60. IMCA will not administer the West Coast Super Stock program next year. The same insurance coverage remains in effect. A subscription to Inside IMCA is included with license purchase. The 2015 license application form is published on Page A21 in this month’s newsletter. It will also be available online.last_img read more

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February 19, 2019 Police Blotter

first_imgFebruary 19, 2019 Police Blotter021919 Ripley County Police Blotter021919 Decatur County EMS Report021919 Decatur County Jail Report021919 Decatur County Fire Report021919 Decatur County Law Reportlast_img

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Scharline Frances Field

first_imgScharline F. (Utter) Field passed away in Mesa, Arizona on Thursday, January 9, 2020. She was 84. She was born Monday, December 30, 1935 in Dillsboro, Indiana. She was raised in a loving family with both parents and her 9 brothers and sisters. She married William R. Field on November 19, 1955 and moved to Osgood, Indiana shortly thereafter. She moved to Mesa in 1971 with her husband and two children. Scharline loved her music and her church. She became very active in the Hi-Way Baptist Church choir after becoming a member in 1972. Scharline was a licensed cosmetologist and owned/operated a beauty salon in East Mesa for many years. She was also dedicated to the comfort, care and love for her dog Sally who will now live out her remaining years under the care of her daughter Lisa.Scharline is survived by her daughter and son-in-law Drs. Lisa and Leland Sherlock; her son and daughter-in-law Robert and Bozena Field; two grandchildren Zachary and Hunter; one sister and two brothers. She is preceded in death by her husband, William; her daughter, Patricia Ann; parents Harley Boyce Utter and Louella Mae Utter (Heath) plus six brothers and sisters.A funeral service will take place on January 17th, 11:00 am at Hi-Way Baptist Church, 10505 East Brown Road, Mesa, Arizona. Visitation in Indiana will be held from 5:00 – 7:00 pm on Thursday, January 23rd at Filter-DeVries-Moore Funeral Home.  Scharline will be laid to rest on Friday, January 24th with Graveside services beginning at 10:00 AM at Oakdale Cemetery.  In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to Old Friends Senior Dog Sanctuary in Mt. Juliet, Tennessee.  Filter-DeVries-Moore Funeral Home entrusted with arrangements, 12887 Lenover Street, Box 146, Dillsboro, Indiana 47018, (812)432-5480.  You may go to www.filterdevriesmoore.com to leave an online condolence message for the family.last_img read more

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US Orders Americans Out Of Iraq Amid Iranian Tensions

first_imgThe move comes a day after the Defense Department warned about the possible threat to Americans in Iraq from Iranian-backed forces as tensions rise between Washington and Tehran. The order to leave said that the U.S. has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Iraq.The White House has reportedly been reviewing possible military options should U.S. forces come under attack by Iran or its proxies. The U.S. is ordering all non-emergency government workers in Iraq to get out.last_img read more

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Bates considering amputation for longer international career

first_img(BBC) – Great Britain wheelchair basketball player George Bates says he may have to consider having his leg amputated to continue his international career.The 26-year-old has been told that his particular disability makes him ineligible to play the sport.Bates was injured playing football aged 11 and has complex regional pain syndrome – a condition that causes persistent severe pain.“I have been deemed to be the ‘wrong kind’ of disabled,” he said.Bates made his senior debut in 2017 after a successful junior career and has gone on to win European and world gold with the GB team.Wheelchair basketball’s governing body, the IWBF, was told earlier this year by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) that it needed to change its classification regulations in order to comply with the IPC’s classification code.The IPC warned that failure by the IWBF to act could result in the sport being removed from future Paralympics, including next year’s rescheduled Tokyo Games.International players are classified between 1.0 (most impaired) and 4.5 (least impaired), and the IPC required all 4.0 and 4.5 players to go through reclassification before Tokyo.Leicester player Bates was originally classified as a 4.5 player.“This condition has left me in constant pain for the past 15 years, as well as with reduced limb movement and muscle deterioration,” he posted on social media.“I will live with this for the rest of my life.”Bates said he chose not to have an amputation as a teenager, hoping for an improvement in his condition, but that has never happened.Athletes who have a lower limb amputation are among those eligible to compete.“Due to the decision of the IPC, I may now be forced to revisit this heart-breaking option,” he said. “It will be a big thing for me to consider.”The Briton said he was considering appealing against the decision.“It is ironic that the IPC – which attempts to base its brand around equality and inclusivity – is deliberately discriminating against athletes who don’t meet its narrow-minded view of what it actually means to be disabled,” he added.In response, the IPC said in a statement that it had sympathy with Bates’ situation but added its classification code states that complex regional pain syndrome is a health condition that does not lead to an eligible impairment to participate in Paralympic sport.last_img read more

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Ennis sees himself fitting into Phoenix’s fast-paced offense

first_img Related Stories Phoenix Suns select Ennis 18th overall, make him 1st SU player taken in 2014 NBA Draft NEW YORK — For a while, there was a chance that Tyler Ennis’ move from the tundra of the Northeast to the blazing temperatures of Phoenix was in jeopardy.“This is probably going to be my first year not seeing snow, but I think change is good,” Ennis said.Minutes after being selected 18th overall by the Phoenix Suns in the first round of the NBA Draft, reports said the Toronto Raptors were pushing to acquire the point guard and bring him to his native Canada.But the Suns refused to loosen their grip on their prospect, and Ennis will indeed be starting his NBA journey in a warmer climate.“I think at this level, you definitely have to earn your keep, earn your minutes on any team you go to,” he said. “I think this is no different situation. I’m ready to come in and learn the system, learn from the veterans and just earn my keep.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textPhoenix selected T.J. Warren, who won the Atlantic Coast Conference Player of the Year with North Carolina State this past year, with the No. 14 overall pick.Ennis will join a backcourt that includes leading scorer Goran Dragic, restricted free agent Eric Bledsoe and Gerald Green.It’s a bit of a crowded rotation, but Ennis said he’s ready to go to work.“I had a really good workout in Phoenix,” Ennis said. “I think heading into next year, it will be a hungry team and I’m more than happy to go in there and contribute to that.”Phoenix ranked eighth in the NBA in offensive efficiency last season, and plays at an up-tempo pace that Ennis said he can handle.“I see myself not turning the ball over too much,” he said, “and I think when you’re on the fast break running, you get vulnerable if you turn over the ball. I think I fit the system going up and down and finding guys in transition.“Their style of play fits mine and I think with the young talent Phoenix has and me being a facilitator, I think it could really work well.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on June 27, 2014 at 12:08 am Contact Phil: pmdabbra@syr.edu | @PhilDAbblast_img read more

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Anae keys strong Women of Troy victory over ASU

first_imgFor the No. 1 USC women’s water polo team, winning has become rather customary this season, further evidenced by the Women of Troy’s shellacking of No. 9 Arizona State in Mountain Pacific Sports Federation play on Saturday afternoon.Playing in its first road game since late February, USC (18-1, 4-1) got off to a hot start on the offensive end and subsequently cruised to a 14-5 victory over host Sun Devils (15-11, 0-6) — the team’s 16th consecutive win.“We talk about getting off to good starts with our press defense,” USC coach Jovan Vavic said, in the wake of the team’s impressive performance. “That helps us get fast break opportunities, which lead to goals. The girls did a great job of that all game.”One of the key performers happened to be senior driver Kally Lucas, who netted two goals early in the first period before finishing with an impressive total of four, as her offensive abilities helped jumpstart the team early.“[Lucas] was on fire today,” Vavic added. “She performed better than she has most of the season. She really did a great job of putting the ball in the corner of the nets on all her shots.”But the senior driver wasn’t the only one to get in a rhythm offensively during the early minutes of the outing. After keeping Arizona State off the scoreboard until the early minutes of the second period, USC reeled off six straight goals to take an 8-1 lead midway through the third period with the help of junior driver Joelle Bekhazi, who recorded two of her three goals during that stretch.But even in the midst of the Women of Troy’s offensive fireworks, which continued until the final buzzer sounded, the defense took center stage as usual.The Sun Devils, who rank third in the conference in scoring, found the net just twice in the first three periods against USC’s seasoned senior goalie Tumua Anae, who reminded fans why she is a reigning first-team All-American.Finishing the afternoon with seven saves, Anae stopped several potential Sun Devil goals that could have swung the momentum in the opposite direction.“[Anae] had some really good saves and stopped a lot of potential goals,” Vavic said. “Overall, we were pretty solid. [Bekhzi] was really good in two-meter defense and so were others. I think our depth really showed today.”A strong defensive front made life a little easier for Anae, as its stifling nature severely limited the Sun Devils’ ability to get any shots on goal.But in the meanwhile, Arizona State was eventually able to tack on three additional goals in the final period, including two from freshman center Shannon Haas, who is unsurprisingly among the MPSF’s leaders in scoring.But while the offensive surge helped make the score a bit more respectable, it was too little too late as the often demanding Vavic was more than pleased with the team’s road win one week before its crosstown showdown against rival UCLA.“We have a lot of work to do and we need to prepare, but the UCLA game will be really fun, especially for our seniors,” Vavic said. “It’s going to be a fight.”last_img read more

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Dina Hegab transitions from clay courts to hard courts and is off to an 8-2 start in singles play

first_imgEverything seemed new for Dina Hegab. She arrived at Syracuse from Egypt in January and her adjustment has been smooth.Almost 6,000 miles away from home, Hegab has had to acclimate to college classes, meet new friends and compete in Division I tennis.But the freshman has also had to transition from the red clay courts she’s played on all her life to the hard courts that are dominant in the United States. And just past the midway point in the season, she’s made the transition seamlessly, budding as one of No. 24 Syracuse’s (8-3, 2-3 Atlantic Coast) most consistent players with an 8-2 singles record thus far.In Hegab’s first match at SU, she posted a 6-4, 6-3 win. She didn’t have her best game, but she won handily in back-to-back sets. It was the first of eight consecutive matches she’d win to start the season.“After that, getting that first win under her belt,” head coach Younes Limam said, “she just relaxed and started trusting her shots more. It didn’t take her a very long time to adjust, honestly.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textUnlike most sports, the surface in tennis significantly influences style of play. Clay courts, made of densely packed crushed brick, play slower than hard courts, which means balls bounce higher and travel at slower speeds on clay courts. This makes it more difficult to deliver an unreturnable shot, so clay courts tend to facilitate longer rallies. So-called “clay-courters,” or those who play on clay-courts, typically sit a few meters behind the baseline and play through the rallies.“It’s a combination of little things,” Limam said of shifting from clay to hard courts. “Part of it is playing a little bit closer to the baseline, having that mindset of being aggressive and being the person who dictates play.”In Egypt, Hegab played behind the baseline in what is considered a more conservative, defensive style. At Syracuse, she must remind herself during matches to creep up toward the baseline. Hegab and Limam continue to “work a ton” on court positioning.Team conditioning has made Hegab quicker and more agile, traits that can separate hard court players. In Egypt, she’d sometimes slide on the clay to hit a ball and rise back to her feet in one continuous motion. On hard courts, however, she can’t slide without severely scraping her skin. Instead she runs in quick bursts, then plants when changing direction.“When I first came, I was a little bit worried to get an ankle sprain or something,” Hegab said. “But I was just careful. It takes time to not slide, but now I’m fine.” Published on March 8, 2016 at 11:15 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 Facebook Twitter Google+ Related Stories Cracking the code: How a snack propelled Syracuse to its highest ranking in program historyHow Maria Tritou’s height helps freshman to 6-2 singles recordcenter_img Eddie Natal | Staff Photographer At one point in a 6-1, 6-2 win against Boston College last month, Hegab fired six backhands in a row. The point grew into a long rally akin to a typical point on clay courts, but after more than 10 full seconds, Hegab spun and smacked a forehand winner by Heini Salonen.Back home, she may have settled and continued the rally with another backhand. Her risky shot that landed just a foot or two from the sideline highlights how she’s acclimated to the new surface.Like Hegab, Limam grew up playing on clay courts in Africa and appreciates Hegab’s plight as well as anybody. He was a member of the Moroccan Junior National Team from 1994 to 1998, when he played on clay courts. Then, from 2000-2003, he tallied 87 wins at Drury University, on hard courts.“It could be a little bit challenging,” Limam said. “Just the conditions, like how slower or faster the courts are. There are a lot of elements. The ball could be a little bit heavier, the court could be a little faster.”Hegab estimates it took about two weeks to get comfortable with the new surface. At first, she played “tight.” Although she dropped her first two singles matches of the season last weekend, she is improving her “feel” for the new surface.“She’s very coachable and very smart on the court,” Limam said. “It’s a process and she’s going in the right direction. I think college tennis is only going to help her transition into a higher level after that.” Commentslast_img read more

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Olympics return to antiquity at the 2004 Athens Games

first_img Associated Press Television News Written By SUBSCRIBE TO US FOLLOW US Last Updated: 16th August, 2020 07:13 IST Olympics Return To Antiquity At The 2004 Athens Games The men’s and women’s marathon races started in the actual town of Marathon, near the ancient battlefield about 26 miles northeast of the capital on the Aegean coast. They finished in central Athens at the Panathenian Stadium, the marble venue used for the opening and closing ceremonies of the inaugural 1896 Games First Published: 16th August, 2020 07:13 ISTcenter_img LIVE TV WATCH US LIVE COMMENT When the Olympics returned to Athens in 2004, they also returned to antiquity.The men’s and women’s marathon races started in the actual town of Marathon, near the ancient battlefield about 26 miles northeast of the capital on the Aegean coast. They finished in central Athens at the Panathenian Stadium, the marble venue used for the opening and closing ceremonies of the inaugural 1896 Games.The shot put events were even farther away, taking place in Ancient Olympia, about 120 miles southwest of Athens. Irina Korzhanenko of Russia became the first woman to win a gold medal at the ancient site that birthed the Olympics. Yuri Bilonoh of Ukraine won the men’s event.Both were soon stripped of their Olympic titles for doping, but the splendor of the venue was not in doubt.“Everybody else has to go to that big, shiny stadium in Athens. We get to do it where it all started,” American thrower John Godina said after qualifying. “I took a lot of classic classes in college. I’ve learned a lot about the whole Olympic movement in ancient Greece. I realize it’s been 1,500 years since anybody has gotten to compete in this stadium.”Back in Athens, the United States won the most medals, but they didn’t win the men’s basketball tournament for the first time since professional players were allowed into the games in 1992. The gold medal instead went to Argentina, a team led by Manu Ginobili.GREEK DRAMAOn the eve of the opening ceremony, the host country was delivered a blow when its two top sprinters, Kostas Kenteris and Ekaterina Thanou, were apparently injured in a motorcycle crash. Kenteris won the 200-meter gold medal at the 2000 Sydney Olympics and Thanou earned silver in the 100 that same year, making them favorites to win at their home games. The pair was soon accused of faking the crash to avoid doping tests. Neither competed at the games.PHELPS’ FIRST MEDALSMichael Phelps, the American swimmer who would win a record eight gold medals in a single games four years later in Beijing, became the first athlete to win eight overall medals (six gold and two bronze) in a non-boycotted Olympics. (Soviet gymnast Alexander Dityatin won eight medals at the 1980 Moscow Games.)NOT SO FASTUsain Bolt competed at the Olympics for the first time, without winning any medals. The Jamaican sprinter ran in the 200 meters but didn’t make it out of the first round. There was much more to come from him in the next three games, however.TRACK TIMEHicham El Guerrouj won a double on the track, while keeping Kenenisa Bekele from doing the same. The Moroccan runner became the first man to win the 1,500-5,000 double since Paavo Nurmi in 1924. Bekele won the 10,000 meters, but ended up second to El Guerrouj in the 5,000. In the women’s competition, Kelly Holmes of Britain also pulled off a double, winning the 800 and 1,500. In other track events, Liu Xiang became the first Chinese man to win an Olympic gold medal in the sport when he won the 110-meter hurdles, and Felix Sanchez did the same for the Dominican Republic in the 400 hurdles.WINNING AGAINGerman kayaker Birgit Fischer set an incredible record of consistency in Athens, becoming the first person in any sport to win two medals in five different Olympics. Fischer started her Olympic career at the 1980 Moscow Games while competing for East Germany. After missing the boycotted 1984 Los Angeles Games, she won at least two medals in Seoul, Barcelona, Atlanta and Sydney before doing the same in Athens.Image credits: AP last_img read more

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Justin Helden – Fingaming – My ICE 2017

first_img Related Articles StumbleUpon Toby Oddy – Digital Fuel – Taking innovation by the horns to deliver a profitable service February 8, 2018 Share DATA.BET to make esports data debut in $250,000 ICE tournament January 15, 2020 Share Submit Jesper Søgaard – Better Collective – Bringing our industry beyond the screen at LAC February 8, 2018 Justin Helden is the CEO & Commercial Director of Fingaming, who are launching their small form factor betting product, Bildabet, at ICE 2017.Justin Helden, FingamingWith less than two weeks to go, we took the time to find out about the Fingaming plans for the London-based conference, and Helden’s memories of ICE conferences gone by.How I prepare for ICEJH: Pre-ICE I’m usually arranging meetings with customers, colleagues and friends, to catch up on the past year and to discuss plans for the year aheadWhat I’m doing at ICE 2017JH: This year we are exhibiting for the first time, as we launch our portfolio of Bildabet products for 2017. The retail industry has been crying out for a small-factor betting terminal that can be loyalty card or cash operated, so it will be very exciting and interesting.What I’m looking forward to at ICE 2017JH: I’m excited this year more than most because of our launch, but also as this is my 10th ICE so I love to see how technology and the products have changed year on year. Plus, I’m excited about what reaction our products will get from the industry.Where you will usually find me at ICEJH: I’ll be found on our stand obviously (S3-100), but also grabbing a coffee and a chat with clients and colleagues. I’m particularly looking forward to the London Baby after party on the first night.Favourite ICE memoryJH: I honestly don’t have ONE. I’ve been coming to ICE for quite a few years and I’ve genuinely enjoyed them all, it’s always great to see old friends.Typical post-ICE activityJH: Sleeping! I know this year more than most will be hectic and very tiring. Friday is a definite day off and then back to contacting all the new people we met on Monday morning.last_img read more

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