June, 2021 Archive

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Video of the Day – Crossbar Challenge

first_imgVideo of the day thumbnail LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Harlequins center_img Harlequins plays host to Scott Quinnell and are today’s contenders in the Crossbar Challenge. With Harlequins soon heading to Abu Dhabi at the end of the month, we thought we’d show you their skills put to the test. Those brave enough to take up the challenge are; Nick Easter, Danny Care, and Carlton Banks (guess who?) to name a few.last_img

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Hardy boys take charge at scrum and lineout

first_imgGLOUCESTER, ENGLAND – JUNE 12: Matt Stevens of England Saxons scrummages during the Churchill Cup match between England Saxons and Tonga at Kingsholm on June 12, 2011 in Gloucester, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) England Saxons prop Matt Stevens tackles Tonga Lea’aetoa at Kingsholm Simon Hardy watched England Saxons overwhelm Tonga at the scrum and lineout and admitted: “As a forwards coach you couldn’t ask for any more.” The Saxons booked their place in next weekend’s Churchill Cup final against Canada with a 41-14 win against the islanders at Kingsholm.They were awarded three penalty tries by referee Romain Poite as Tonga’s scrum was dismantled ruthlessly – and dominated the lineout to such an extent that they stole the ball on seven successive occasions. Captain Jordan Crane scored one try and made another for Leicester Tigers teammate Billy Twelvetrees with Harlequins fly half Rory Clegg adding 16 points with five conversions and two penalties.“I’ve never seen a game with three penalty tries where we’ve been so dominant,” said Hardy, who oversees the forward operation under head coach Stuart Lancaster. “As a group we did our homework, looked at what they did and how they scrummaged. We talk as a front row, then get the rest of the forwards to buy into it and then it becomes an eight-man operation. It was one of those lucky days when it all went right.“The lineout is down to hard work, looking at how we’re going to defend, looking at how they throw, their options and movements, putting the right people in the right places.“James Gaskell was just phenomenal in terms of his movement and you’ve got to have two guys to put him up in the air. In the morning we were in a corridor in the hotel just rehearsing the movements – where we say ‘If they go here, we’ll go there’ and speeding reactions up. In all we had a magnificent day and as a forwards coach you couldn’t ask for any more.” “Canada will have had two games to look at us and I’m sure they’ll be up to speed and prepared for what we can bring. You’ve seen two styles of rugby in two games from us.”The Saxons – 87-8 winners against the USA last weekend – top Pool A and meet Canada next Saturday at Sixways (4.30pm). The USA face Russia in the Bowl final (12pm) and Italy A meet Tonga in the Plate final (2.15pm). Worcester Warriors prop Matt Mullan, London Irish hooker David Paice and Saracens’ Matt Stevens faced France-based front row trio Tonga Lea’aetoa, Semiei Telefoni and Kisi Pulu Mullan said: “It was slightly unexpected. We knew it would be tough up front and it was physical – there are a few sore bodies around – but to come out on top was very pleasing We watched them on Wednesday and you pick up a couple of things you think might work. It’s nothing too secret – you have things that you work on as a pack and pick up on things that they do or don’t do and take advantage.”Exeter Chiefs flanker Tom Johnson – playing his second game on the open side – hopes to continue his progress against Canada next weekend.Johnson said: “There’s a nice balance to the back row and I’m enjoying playing seven at the moment. It’s just all carried on from the way the season’s gone with the Chiefs. The coaches have helped me massively to get me to where I am and these boys here are a real good bunch and it’s just about fitting in with everyone’s game plan. [Head coach] Stuart Lancaster has a real good philosophy on how we’re going to play and we’re all buying into it. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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RBS Six Nations: France search for the perfect combination

first_imgAs for the return on the wing of Maxime Médard at the expense of Benjamin Fall, Saint-Andre explained that it was a selection based on the strength of Medard’s kicking game even if his preferred position is full-back. “Yoann [Huget] has put in some good performances at full-back since the start of the tournament. And we know that in Ireland, probably under the rain since the forecasters haven’t promised a blue sky, he can expect to receive some up and unders.”Huget expects, and so do France, but will Les Bleus finally deliver? Working relationship: Morgan Parra and Frederic Michalak are France’s third half-back combination in four gamesBy Gavin MortimerTHIRD TIME lucky for France? Philippe Saint-Andre will be hoping so when his third half-back pairing of the Six Nations run out against Ireland in Dublin on Saturday evening. The French coach began the tournament with Maxime Machenaud and Frederic Michalak, a combination he retained for Wales even after the defeat to Italy on the opening weekend. But when France went down to the Welsh in Paris, Saint-Andre brought in Morgan Parra and Francois Trinh-Duc for the visit to England. Another defeat and another change, this time Michalak coming back in at 10 and Parra continuing in the No 9 shirt.It was the dominant issue of the press conference this morning following the team announcement, the French press clamouring to hear the reason behind yet another half-back partnership. This is the same media that has pointed the finger of blame for France’s worst start to a Six Nations in 30 years mainly at Michalak. Such is the fickle nature of modern sport.Direction: Michalak has been strugglingIn November the Toulon star could do no wrong. His virtuoso display in France’s 33-6 thrashing of Australia at the Stade de France had the Parisian crowd on its feet chanting his name. The press joined in the orgy of adulation, welcoming back Michalak after a break of four years with headlines such as ‘Hail the Prodigal Son’. Three months later and the 30-year-old was public enemy number one, despite the fact he was performing no worse than most of his teammates.Saint-Andre is expecting a vastly improved performance from France against Ireland, and he believes a refreshed Michalak will be the catalyst. “Frederic’s had time to rest [and] compared to three weeks ago he’s regenerated,” he told reporters. Saint-Andre revealed that the Toulon conditioning coaches have discussed Michalak’s physical condition with their counterparts in the national squad and as a result “he’s a lot more fresh today”. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Michalak has always been a confidence player. Certainly in his younger days his cocky exterior concealed an insecurity and fragility that had to be handled with care. Bernard Laporte found it a challenge, Marc Lievremont didn’t even bother and Saint-Andre appears to be realizing that the best way to get the best out of Michalak is to make him feel loved. “Frederic was excellent in November and he played 50 minutes of quality against Italy,” said the French coach. “Over the course of the last eight matches, of course the number one is Frederic Michalak.”Taking instructions: Maxime Medard returnsThe presence of Parra at scrum-half will also ease the pressure on Michalak, not just because he’s so much more experienced than Machenaud but because he can also kick for goal. All Michalak has to do therefore is spark his backline into life. He’ll be helped in that respect by the return of Florian Fritz at outside centre, the Toulouse 13 in line to win his 29th cap. Saint-Andre suggested in the press-conference that Mathieu Bastareaud was left out because of an illness earlier in the week, but it’s more likely he’s finally come to the conclusion that the big man is all brawn and little brain. Fritz is a different proposition altogether, a clever footballer who runs good lines and won’t be wrong-footed in defence by the dancing feet of Brian O’Driscoll. France’s rugby union national team head coach Philippe Saint-Andre (L) speaks with left wing Maxime Medard during a training session on March 7, 2013 in Marcoussis, south of Paris, as part of the preparation for the Six Nations rugby union tournament. France will play Ireland in their 2013 Six nations rugby match on March 23, 2013 in Lansdowne Road. AFP PHOTO / FRANCK FIFE (Photo credit should read FRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images) last_img read more

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Six Nations Fixtures 2015

first_imgThe 2015 Six Nations promises to be an intriguing warm-up to the Rugby World Cup, here are the fixtures NEXT SEASON’S RBS Six Nations kicks off on Friday, 6th February, with Wales taking on England at the Millennium Stadium in a pre-World Cup warm-up. So here you go, dates for the diaries for the next year’s Six Nations… (times are UK and Ireland)2014 RBS Six Nations resultsSaturday, 1 February: Wales 23-15 Italy; France 26-24 EnglandSunday, 2 February: Ireland 28-6 ScotlandSaturday, 8 February: Ireland 26-3 Wales; Scotland 0-20 EnglandSunday, 9 February: France 30-10 ItalyFriday, 21 February: Wales 27-6 FranceSaturday 22 February: Italy 20-21 Scotland; England 13-10 IrelandSaturday, 8 March: Ireland 46-7 Italy; Scotland 17-19 FranceSunday, 9 March: England 29-18 WalesSaturday, 15 March: Italy 11-52 England; Wales 51-3 Scotland; France 20-22 Ireland2015 RBS Six Nations Fixtures Fitting finale: Ireland gave Brian O’Driscoll a rousing send-off by picking up their second Six Nations in five years LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Wales  begin the 2015 Six Nations on home soil, entertaining England on the evening of Friday, 6 February.Grudge match: The 2015 Six Nations starts with the iconic Wales v England gameFriday, 6 February – Wales v England 8.05pmSaturday, 7 February – Italy v Ireland 2.30pm; France v Scotland 5pmSaturday, 14 February – England v Italy 2.30pm; Ireland v France 5pmSunday, 15 February – Scotland v Wales 3pmSaturday, 28 February – Scotland v Italy 2.30pm, France v Wales 5pmSunday, 1 March – Ireland v England 3pmSaturday, 14 March – Wales v Ireland 2.30pm; England v Scotland 5pmSunday, 15 March – Italy v France 3pm Saturday, 21 March – Italy v Wales 12.30pm; Scotland v Ireland 2.30pm; England v France 5pmTo find out what’s in the new start-of-season Rugby World special, click here http://po.st/q2PucClast_img read more

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Heineken Cup round four: Team of the weekend

first_img Saints Day: Luther Burrell helped Northampton to victory over Leinster in Dublin, and makes our team of the weekBy Charlie Morgan 15. Luke Arscott (Exeter Chiefs)With characteristic defiance, the Chiefs carried the fight to the European champions in their own back yard at times. Statistics for full-backs can often have an inflated look about them, but 191 running metres with four clean breaks and an incredible 11 defenders beaten reflect Arscott’s attacking prowess. There was a nice looping pass in the build-up to Don Armand’s opener and he would have had a late try too without the superb intervention of Drew Mitchell.14. Charlie Walker (Harlequins)With Marland Yarde and Christian Wade set to miss the Six Nations, this is a perfect time for young English winners to be catching the eye. Walker is certainly doing that, and brushed off Dan Lydiate on the way to the line yesterday in a performance full of excellent evasion, pace and deceptive strength. One seriously exciting 20 year-old.13. Niki Goneva (Leicester Tigers)While not quite hitting the explosive heights of last weekend’s Welford Road masterclass in midfield incision, the Fijian was a constant threat in the south of France. He was also opportunistic enough to be on Marcos Ayerza’s shoulder in the dying seconds, cannily scampering under the posts to secure another great escape for Leicester.12. Luther Burrell (Northampton Saints)Somewhat shell-shocked as his side were ruthlessly dismantled by Leinster at Franklin’s Gardens, Burrell stormed into the second leg of the halfway double-header with renewed intent. Perhaps helped by the distracting presence of new centre partner George North – whom he set up for an early score with a neat pass – the burly Saint was also solid in defence opposite Gordon D’Arcy, making 13 thumping tackles.11. Napolioni Nalaga (Clermont)A try after 17 seconds is a pretty good way to begin an afternoon, and such an early score took the wind from Scarlets’ sails. As the clock ran down, Nalaga completed his brace with another powerful, predatory close-range barge to ram home Clermont’s superiority.Cuddle time: Beauxis and Médard celebrate10. Lionel Beauxis (Toulouse)Out of contract at the end of the season, Beauxis gave a convincing audition for budding suitors – ensuring in the process that there would be no repeat miracle at Showgrounds. A pair of kicks into space behind the Connacht rush-defence handed Maxime Médard a double, while he also bagged 12 points from the tee.9. Benoit Paillaugue (Montpellier)Ben Youngs grew in influence at the end of Leicester’s sensational smash-and-grab, but that was only after this five foot seven throwback of a half-back had departed the scene. Before making way, the diminutive Montpellier scrum half produced a display full of spark and imagination, laying on a try for Enzo Selponi with a rapid run and extremely unselfish pass.1. James Cronin (Munster) TAGS: Exeter Chiefs LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Munster’s last-gasp success in Perpignan added another chapter to their vast history in this tournament, but while it was JJ Hanrahan’s stunning, stepping score that clinched it, Cronin was the real star. Along with BJ Botha, he demolished the Catalan set-piece and was spritely enough to make 22 metres with ball in hand.2. Tom Youngs (Leicester Tigers)Montpellier made seven changes to their pack, but their insane squad depth still meant they gave Tigers a hefty, hungry set of forwards to deal with. Youngs was the heartbeat of that first victorious Channel-hop for Leicester since 2006. A try, 11 tackles, 13 carries, decent lineout throwing and some typically tenacious ruck-work gives you an idea of the hooker’s simply immense effort. Oh, and he picked a fight with Mamuka Gorgodze.3. Jon Welsh (Glasgow)Welsh must still be wondering how Glasgow contrived to be beaten by Cardiff Blues at Scotstoun on Friday evening. Alongside Ryan Grant, he gave the hosts a fine platform with some hugely destructive scrimmaging that sent opposite number Sam Hobbs to the sinbin on the half-hour mark. There were also six carries, none of which added to Glasgow’s suicidal tally of 23 turnovers.4. Christian Day (Northampton)Eye-watering physicality was the order of the day in Dublin and this unsung Saint stepped up to the plate magnificently. Day never receives the column inches reserved for Courtney Lawes’ Hollywood hits, but his presence at the lineout and combative industry elsewhere allowed Jim Mallinder’s men to secure sweet revenge and stay afloat in the competition.5. Dan Tuohy (Ulster)A trip to Treviso has long been considered a perilous banana skin in European rugby. However, Ulster negotiated a potential tricky tie – not to mention a farcical amount of fog – with relative ease. On his 100th game for the province, Tuohy laid the foundations for a consecutive bonus-point win that puts keeps a tough pool in his team’s hands.In the pink: Copeland celebrates6. Calum Clark (Northampton)Another of Dylan Hartley’s pack to thrive in the most intense fixture of this round, Clark demonstrated why he should probably have started last weekend. Granted, the late withdrawal of Sean O’Brien was a bonus, but he epitomised Saints’ ferocity at the breakdown and in the contact area, topping the tackle-count with 14.7. Roddy Grant (Edinburgh)Gloucester boss Nigel Davies used his post-match interview to hand out some thinly-veiled criticism to his half-backs, but with Grant yapping at their heels it was never easy for them. The Edinburgh openside made 19 tackles without missing once, and hopes of a Scottish quarter-finalist are still alive.8. Robin Copeland (Cardiff Blues) Having secured a move to Munster that will fuel international ambitions nicely, Copeland proved he still has plenty to offer his current employers with a gritty, scrapping night of effective graft that somehow held off a woefully wasteful Glasgow. “It was a dogfight,” asserted the back-rower at the end – just how he likes it.last_img read more

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Paul Gustard shock Harlequins exit

first_img Paul Gustard has left Harlequins by mutual consent, the club have announced. He joined in the summer of 2018, previously working with Eddie Jones as England’s defensive coach.Overall, Gustard lost more games than he won in his tenure, although that doesn’t depict the full story. In his two full seasons with Quins, he managed to achieve fifth and sixth-placed finishes. He departs with the club currently in seventh, with two wins from six games.Gustard also lead Harlequins to the semi-finals of 2018-19 Challenge Cup, before falling just short in last season’s Premiership Cup final to a strong Sale side. He oversaw a major transformation in the playing squad during his time at the club. However, the same issues around discipline, defence and identity resurfaced within the side.The main man: Gustard left England’s coaching staff to become manager of Harlequins in 2018 (Getty Images)“The Club thanks Paul for his tireless energy and commitment over the last two and a half years,” in a statement issued by Harlequins. “His passion and drive to succeed have been evident throughout his time at the Club. Everyone at Harlequins wishes Paul and his family all the very best for the future.” Harlequins  general manager Billy Millard will oversee first-team affairs until the end of the season. Millard spent four years as manager of Australia’s Sevens team, and will be supported by Jerry Flannery, Nick Evans and Adam Jones. There has been speculation over the next manager, although the club have declined further comment.“The Club will determine the optimum future structure for its coaching team and will confirm any further changes and appointments in due course.”Scott Robertson, manager of Crusaders in New Zealand, was reportedly Quins’ second choice in 2018 after Gustard. Richard Cockerill, of Pro14 side Edinburgh, has also been touted for the role, but remains under contract until 2023. Gustard leaves the club by mutual consent in order to “enable him to pursue other opportunities” after two and a half years in charge Shock departure: Gustard has surprisingly left Quins by mutual consent (Getty Images) Follow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, Table, Venues, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagramlast_img read more

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Six Nations France v Wales Preview

first_img Everything you need to know about how this… Jacob Whitehead picks out a handful of standout… Paul Willemse and Alun Wyn Jones compete at a lineout last October (Getty Images) The Gloucester and Wales wing explains how sprint… Can Alun Wyn Jones lead his country to a second Grand Slam in three years? Why Louis Rees-Zammit is getting faster That’s @FranceRugby at its very best. Enjoy this one, rugby fans. #GuinnessSixNations #ENGvFRA pic.twitter.com/lw8oJANcnM— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) March 13, 2021What will be key on Saturday night in Paris is mindset. France beat Wales twice in 2020, but will they be dejected after letting their own Grand Slam dream slip away at Twickenham? Or will they be fired up to win their first home game of this year’s championship and target the title?There are myriad permutations in the title race and Wales will know that they can still lift the trophy even if they lose, providing they pick up the requisite bonus points. They certainly have more experience than France, particularly of big occasions like this, but they will need to be resilient without the ball and ruthless with it if they are to complete another clean sweep.What’s the big team news?There’s little to report here. Fabien Galthie has stuck with the same starting XV that lost narrowly to England last week.He has made a few changes on the bench, reverting to a five-three split between forwards and backs rather than the six-two he selected for Twickenham. Uini Atonio, Swan Rebbadj and Arthur Vincent are the new faces amongst the replacements.Wayne Pivac has made just one change to his run-on team, Adam Beard returning to the second row to replace Cory Hill having been rested for the Italy match last weekend. “He’s a big man and we’re up against some big men,” said Pivac. The 𝙨𝙩𝙚𝙥!Teddy Thomas scores his second of the game and brings up the 50 for France #GuinnessSixNations #ITAvFRA pic.twitter.com/PPY1tCjxoI— Guinness Six Nations (@SixNationsRugby) February 6, 2021Luke Pearce (Sportsfile/Getty Images)What time does it kick off and is it on TV?Wales v France, Saturday 20 March, Stade de FranceThis match kicks off at 8pm UK time (9pm local time in Paris) and it will be broadcast live on BBC One and S4C (UK) and Virgin Media (Ireland). There will also be live commentary on BBC Radio 5 Live Sports.If you want to tune in from outside the UK & ireland, check out our ‘how to watch’ guide for wherever you are in the world.It’s an all-RFU officiating team for this one with Luke Pearce as referee, Matthew Carley and Christophe Ridley the assistants, and Wayne Barnes the TMO.What are the line-ups?FRANCE: Brice Dulin; Teddy Thomas, Virimi Vakatawa, Gael Fickou, Damian Penaud; Matthieu Jalibert, Antoine Dupont; Cyril Baille, Julien Marchand, Mohamed Haouas, Romain Taofifenua, Paul Willemse, Dylan Cretin, Charles Ollivon (captain), Gregory Alldritt.Replacements: Camille Chat, Jean-Baptiste Gros, Uini Atonio, Swan Rebbadj, Anthony Jelonch, Baptiste Serin, Romain Ntamack, Arthur Vincent.WALES: Liam Williams; Louis Rees-Zammit, George North, Jonathan Davies, Josh Adams; Dan Biggar, Gareth Davies; Wyn Jones, Ken Owens, Tomas Francis, Adam Beard, Alun Wyn Jones (captain), Josh Navidi, Justin Tipuric, Taulupe Faletau.Replacements: Elliot Dee, Nicky Smith, Leon Brown, Cory Hill, James Botham, Tomos Williams, Callum Sheedy, Uilisi Halaholo. “Obviously, they bring a lot of attacking threats and they’ve got a very good attacking kicking game. So I think our back three, in particular, are going to have a lot of work to do.”MORE ON THE SIX NATIONS Five of the Best Wales v France Matches Expand From beginnings at @BirchgroveRFC @UplandsRFC & @RfcMorriston, Adam Beard has come through the Player Pathway Programme into the Ospreys senior squad & @WelshRugbyUnion set-upThe 6″8 Lock joined us to talk about his developmenthttps://t.co/QOp7X0gfbw#OspreysInTheMaking pic.twitter.com/mwmqAxNMpI— Ospreys (@ospreys) January 27, 2021He has also tweaked his bench with Nicky Smith the replacement loosehead rather than Rhys Carre, James Botham taking the place of Aaron Wainwright and Tomos Williams fit to cover scrum-half. It’s the latter who could have the most impact as Williams’s sniping game could give Wales the spark they need in the closing stages if the match is close.What have the coaches said?France coach Fabien Galthie: “We are happy with the performance of the team against England. We are very satisfied with the potential of this team. The challenge is to exploit this potential to the full.“Wales is a team with a strong culture, monstrous collective experience because they have an average age of 30 and more than 60 caps per player on average. They are competitors. Until Saturday, they lead the competition.”Wales head coach Wayne Pivac: “We know we’re going to be in for a very big challenge. They have quality right across the park and they come up with some great plays. We’re going to have to have our wits about us. Expand TAGS: Highlight France v Wales: Six Nations title permutations Six Nations France v Wales PreviewLuck? Or judgement?People have described Wales’ 2021 Six Nations campaign as fortuitous, what with the red cards issued to Ireland’s Peter O’Mahony and Scotland’s Zander Fagerson as well as the two controversial try decisions in the England match.Yet that does a disservice to Wales’ performances as they chase yet another Grand Slam. They have been clinical in attack, scoring 17 tries in four matches, including four for Louis Rees-Zammitt. Their ‘red zone’ efficiency – scoring points when in the opposition 22 – is, according to the QBE Risk & Reward Index, the highest in the championship at 2.51 while France average 1.58.Wales wing Louis Rees-Zammit breaks past Teddy Thomas in Paris last year (Getty Images)Their defence has been solid and the four top tacklers in this year’s championship are Welsh in Justin Tipuric (74), Josh Navidi and Taulupe Faletau (both 60) and Alun Wyn Jones (58). Their set-piece has improved markedly since the autumn, too, with the return of Ken Owens significant and Adam Beard taking charge of the lineout calls.Wales are now seeing the benefit of using last autumn to develop depth in their squad as well as marrying some of the pragmatic belligerence they were known for under Warren Gatland with the more attack-minded philosophies of new coach Wayne Pivac.Having said all that, France – the team that stands in the way of a fifth Wales Grand Slam in the Six Nations era – have played the best rugby of any country in Europe over the past year. When they click, their attack is a thing of beauty – the Damian Penaud try against England last weekend a case in point. What are the odds?France are favourites for this match, with odds of 5-13 on Bet365. A Wales win is 9-4 or you can get odds of 25-1 for a draw. However, Wales are still odds-on to win the title at 4-11, with France at 9-4.If you fancy putting some money on the fixture, Bet365 have a welcome bonus of up to £100 in Bet Credits.Min deposit £5. Bet Credits available for use upon settlement of bets to value of qualifying deposit. Min odds, bet and payment method exclusions apply. Returns exclude Bet Credits stake. Time limits and T&Cs apply.Over-18s only. BeGambleAware.Any interesting statistics?Fourteen of the Wales starting XV have won at least one Six Nations Grand Slam. Louis Rees-Zammit is the only player who hasn’t.If Wales win, Alun Wyn Jones will become the fourth man to win four Grand Slams in the professional era after France’s Fabien Pelous and Olivier Magne as well as England’s Jason Leonard. He would also join those players in having more Slams than Ireland and Scotland.France have beaten more defenders on average than any other side in this Six Nations – 27 per match – while Wales have beaten the fewest (12.5).France (1,131) and Wales (901) have averaged the most kicking metres per game in the 2021 championship. They have also averaged the most successful tackles, Wales with 175 and France with 161.Wales have made 144 metres from their maul in the Six Nations – 85 more than any other side – while France’s 27 offloads are more than any other side.Teddy Thomas has beaten 14 defenders from 14 carries – the best rate of any player with more than one carry. France v Wales: Six Nations title permutations Five of the Best Wales v France Matches Why Louis Rees-Zammit is getting faster LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Collapse Can’t get to the shops? Download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet. Subscribe to the print edition for magazine delivery to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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Faith groups participate in peace initiative for London Olympics

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET [Ecumenical News International, London] Faith leaders and community groups in London are promoting “One Hundred Days of Peace” — an initiative to develop a “peace legacy” for the London Olympic Games this summer.Churches, schools and colleges, together with a coalition called London Citizens that includes more than 300 faith and community groups are organizing ecumenical programs of prayer and a range of activities linked to the Olympics to promote peace. These include a campaign called City Safe, which aims to build a network between shops and businesses across London to fight crime. Other activities involve street vigils, talks, discussions and the creation of several peace gardens.Organizer noted that London has experienced violence and trauma in recent years. “The Olympic bid was won in July 2005 amidst great rejoicing across London. The following day the [terrorist] London bombings took place. Last summer, London experienced dramatic outbreaks of rioting and looting. The need for peace in our city has never been greater,” said Barbara Kentish, Justice and Peace fieldworker with the Catholic Diocese of Westminster. In the 2005 bombings on the London Underground and buses, 52 people were killed and 700 injured.In the Athletes’ Village at Olympics Park, a six-room multifaith space has been created to serve Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Sikh, Jewish, Bahá’í , Jain, Buddhist and Zoroastrian athletes and their supporters. During the Games more than 200 volunteer chaplains will be on duty. Volunteers from all faiths will also be assisting as guides and first aiders, supplying refreshments and counseling.The tradition of an Olympics truce was established in 9th century BC to enable competitors and spectators to travel safely to and from the games through ancient Greece’s warring city-states. The International Olympic Committee decided to revive the ancient concept of the Olympic truce with the view to protecting the interests of the athletes and sport in general, and to encourage the search for peaceful and diplomatic solutions to conflicts around the world.For more information see: http://www.peacelegacy.org.uk/ and http://www.citizensuk.org. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Faith groups participate in peace initiative for London Olympics Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ecumenical & Interreligious Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Anglican Communion, Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska By Jo SiedleckaPosted Feb 15, 2012 last_img read more

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La peregrinación de #ShareTheJourney comienza en Kenia

first_img Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events El 4 de marzo, el obispo anglicano Joel Waweru, de la Diócesis de Nairobi, da la bienvenida a Kenia a los peregrinos de #ShareTheJourney y les ofrece un breve resumen de la Iglesia Anglicana en ese país. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS.[Episcopal News Service – Nairobi, Kenia] Ocho peregrinos de #ShareTheJourney [un empeño de medios de difusión múltiples de educar, formar y adiestrar a episcopales para que se comprometan en amoroso servicio con refugiados reasentados y se conviertan en testigos proféticos y promotores de refugiados, asilados, migrantes y personas desplazadas en todo el mundo] llegaron a Nairobi el 3 de marzo para una peregrinación de 11 días a Kenia y Ruanda al objeto de ponerse al tanto de las dificultades de los refugiados congoleses y del proceso por el que tienen que pasar para conseguir un reasentamiento en Estados Unidos.“Espero que el resultado de este viaje será una mayor comprensión de lo constituye, en la Iglesia Episcopal, un programa único y especial del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, y que más episcopales puedan ver un lugar para ellos en este ministerio de salvar vidas”, dijo Deborah Stein, directora del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, el programa de reasentamiento de refugiados de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera (DFMS), que dirige esta peregrinación.(La DFMS —Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society— es el nombre legal y canónico con el cual la Iglesia Episcopal está incorporada, funciona empresarialmente y lleva a cabo la misión).Además de reunirse con organizaciones no gubernamentales, entre ellas el Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados (UNHCR) y el Centro de Apoyo para el Reasentamiento en África del Servicio Mundial de Iglesias, los peregrinos viajarán a Ruanda para visitar el Centro en Memoria del Genocidio en Kigali y el Campamento de Refugiados de Gihembe.La peregrinación es parte de #ShareTheJourney, una campaña, de un año de duración, del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración en su 75º. aniversario, con vistas a crear conciencia de las formas en que la Sociedad Misionera trabaja para facilitar el reasentamiento de refugiados a través de la Iglesia Episcopal.“Creo que el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración es uno de los ministerios más inspiradores y menos conocidos de la Iglesia Episcopal”, dijo el Rdo. Scott Gunn, uno de los peregrinos y director ejecutivo del Movimiento Adelante [Forward Movement], un ministerio de la Iglesia Episcopal, con sede en Cincinnati, Ohio, que fomenta el discipulado. “Estoy ansioso de ver la transformación en mi propia vida según experimento esta peregrinación, y quiero hacer todo lo que pueda para compartir este viaje con otras personas”.A través del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, la DFMS se asocia con 30 programas de reasentamiento afiliados en 26 diócesis de toda la nación. Es una de las nueve agencias que trabajan en asociación con el Departamento de Estado de EE.UU. para recibir y reubicar a refugiados en Estados Unidos.En 2014, La DFMS colaboró con sus asociados para reasentar a 5.155 de las decenas de miles de refugiados que vinieron a Unidos a través del proceso de selección del UNHCR.En el curso de los próximos años, el UNHCR se propone reasentar 50.000 refugiados del Congo, de los cuales del 70 al 90 por ciento serán reubicados en Estados Unidos.Desde 1998, más de 5,5 millones de personas han muerto en el Congo por causa de la guerra, las enfermedades y la desnutrición en lo que se considera el conflicto con más víctimas mortales desde la segunda guerra mundial. Aproximadamente 2,5 millones de personas se han visto desplazadas interiormente, y unas 500.000 han huido del prolongado conflicto del país, la vasta mayoría de los cuales vive en campamentos de refugiados en las regiones de los Grandes Lagos y en el Cuerno de África.“No hay ninguna otra solución perdurable para este grupo de refugiados, que ha estado esperando por más de una década en campamentos de refugiados sin esperanza de futuro”, dijo Stein. “Algunos han sido reasentados o han encontrado un modo de establecerse en el país de asilo, pero el resto languidece en los campamentos. El reasentamiento es la única opción para ellos”.Un refugiado es alguien que ha huido de su país de origen debido a “un temor bien fundado de persecución” debido a su raza, religión, etnia o su afiliación política o social.Hay 15,5 millones de refugiados en todo el mundo, según cifras del UNHCR, cuyo mandato es brindarles protección internacional a los refugiados. El interés fundamental del organismo es la repatriación, o el regreso seguro al país de origen, seguido por la ciudadanía o residencia legal en el país de acogida. La tercera opción es el reasentamiento en uno de los 22 países en todo el mundo que aceptan refugiados. A un uno por ciento se le concede reasentamiento en un tercer país, con la mitad de ese 1 por ciento destinada a Estados Unidos.El proceso de reasentamiento suele tomar años; los refugiados pueden pasar décadas viviendo en campamentos antes de que sus casos sean oídos y resueltos. Kenia es uno de los dos países —el otro es Etiopía— que acoge al mayor número de refugiados que viven en campamentos en África.“Uno de los efectos del reasentamiento es que constituye una muestra de apoyo de parte de los países que acogen refugiados; le da un respiro a los países anfitriones para seguir manteniendo abiertas sus fronteras a futuros refugiados y solicitantes de asilo”, apuntó Stein. “Los refugiados congoleses son sólo un grupo de los muchos que esperan por una solución permanente similar”.La peregrinación de #ShareTheJourney se costeó a través de una subvención del Fondo Constable asignada en 2014 por el Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal. El Fondo Constable ofrece subvenciones para financiar iniciativas de misión que no fueron contempladas en el presupuesto de la Iglesia Episcopal aprobado por la Convención General.Siga a los peregrinos en #ShareTheJourney en Twitter (@EMMRefugees); en Facebook aquí; en el blog aquí; o a través de los medios de difusión aquí.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS La peregrinación de #ShareTheJourney comienza en Kenia Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Knoxville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Por Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 9, 2015 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT last_img read more

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English king’s remains reburied after 530 years

first_img March 28, 2015 at 2:07 pm It is interesting dispute with liturgy of burial among Christian denominations, where every denomination believes the same Lord, same God Head and same resting place (Heaven) for eternal life. It is kind of dispute more or less like the dispute among Disciples of Christ with opportunity of sitting at right hand of Jesus Christ. But Jesus’ command is clear to all His disciples uniting as Holy Trinity is united. So why do we dispute with burial of English King’s remains as long King Richard-III and we Anglican believe the same God of Holy Trinity? Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Anglican Communion, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments (4) March 26, 2015 at 10:55 pm Question: Why was King Richard, a Catholic, buried in an Anglican Cathedral? Yes, a Catholic Mass was said earlier, but why not allow a Catholic burial in a neutral site? What would happen if Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth, would be buried in a Catholic cathedral by a Catholic priest when she dies? Oh, wait…she might even by buried by an Islamic Inman instead. If people are given a religious burial, then that burial should be in the deceased faith. How difficult is this to recognize and implement? Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME March 27, 2015 at 10:08 am I find this a strange question. Richard was a Christian, and he has been buried in a Christian church. It’s worth pointing out that Protestantism (including the independent Anglican Church) did not exist in Richard’s day, when what we now call Roman Catholicism was ubiquitous throughout Western Europe. Who knows what “religion” Richard might have been had history been different? I would argue that it is appropriate that, as a former King of England, Richard be buried within the rites and physical context of England’s national, established church. Andrew Walkling says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Julian Malakar says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Clergy and an honor guard surround Richard III’s casket March 26 prior to it being buried in Leicester Cathedral. Photo: King Richard in Leicester website[Episcopal News Service] History buffs from all over the world joined royal, civil and ecclesiastical representatives in Leicester, England, on a rainy March 26 for the reburial of a king whose bones were found in 2012 under a parking lot.Richard III, the last Plantagenet king of England, died aged 32 on Aug. 22, 1485 during the Battle of Bosworth.His skeleton was found in 2012 in the ruins of the Greyfriars priory buried beneath a parking lot in what the New York Times called “one of the most astonishing archaeological hunches in modern history.”Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby led the reburial ceremony in Leicester Cathedral along with members of the British royal family, Bishop of Leicester Tim Stevens, senior ecumenical clergy, civic leaders and descendants of Richard III.Emma Chamberlain, 9, from Aylestone (a suburb of Leicester) and a member of the 1st Aylestone Brownies, places a crown on Richard III’s casket March 22 after it was brought to Leicester Cathedral. Photo: King Richard in Leicester websiteDuring the somber ceremony based on Morning Prayer (order of service here), Welby censed Richard III’s casket and blessed it with holy water.“As we return the bones of your servant Richard to the grave, we beseech you to grant him a quiet resting place,” Welby prayed.Welby also sprinkled the coffin with soils from Fotheringhay, Middleham and Bosworth. Richard III was born at Fotheringhay Castle in Northamptonshire and members of his family are buried at the local church. Middleham in Yorkshire is where Richard met his future wife Anne.“Today we come to accord this King, this child of God, these mortal remains, the dignity and honor denied them in death,” Stevens said during the homily. Members of the team that found Richard’s remains have said that his initial casket-less burial was done in a hurried fashion in a too-short grave, causing the king’s head to need to be pushed askew.Also during the service, actor Benedict Cumberbatch read “Richard,” a poem written for the occasion by Poet Laureate Dame Carol Ann Duffy. Cumberbatch will play Richard III in the BBC series “The Hollow Crown: The Wars of the Roses.” He has also been identified as a third cousin, 16 times removed of Richard. A YouTube clip of Cumberbatch’s reading during the service is here.An honor guard March 26 lowers Richard III’s casket into a new tomb in Leicester Cathedral. Photo: King Richard in Leicester websiteThe casket was lowered into a tomb within an ambulatory (a walking space) between the newly created Chapel of Christ the King at the east end of Leicester Cathedral and the sanctuary, a location not far from where Richard’s remains were found. The stone used in the design of the tomb is a Swaledale fossil stone, quarried in North Yorkshire, that contains fossils of long-dead creatures. It is topped with a Kilkenny marble plinth bearing Richard’s name, dates and motto.The New York Times noted that some saw Richard’s reburial in an Anglican cathedral and Welby’s participation as an anomaly, since Richard was a devout Roman Catholic who died well before Henry VIII’s break with Rome in the 1530s.Cardinal Vincent Nichols, the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Westminster, preached at a March 22 service of Compline (order of service here) at Leicester Cathedral when the king’s mortal remains were received. The remains were carried from the University of Leicester by the team who discovered them.Many heard the cardinal’s sermon “as a deft message of reconciliation to the contending schools of thought about Richard’s legacy as king,” according to The New York Times article. Richard has been cast as a hunch-backed villain who killed two young princes but who also reformed parts of English law. Nichols said he was also a man who prayed, noting in a Vatican Radio interview that Welby would bring Richard’s prayer book with him to the March 26 service. The book contained Richard’s annotations and a prayer the king wrote.Cardinal Vincent Nichols, the Roman Catholic archbishop of Westminster, preached at a March 22 service of Compline at Leicester Cathedral when Richard’s remains were received. Photo: King Richard in Leicester websiteNichols cautioned in his sermon that power in Richard’s time was “invariably won or maintained on the battlefield and only by ruthless determination, strong alliances and a willingness to employ the use of force, at times with astonishing brutality.”On March 23, Nichols also presided at an evening Requiem Mass for the repose of the soul of Richard III in Holy Cross Priory , a Roman Catholic Dominican priory in Leicester. In his homily, the cardinal called the king “a man of anxious devotion.” Nichols vested for the Mass in the Westminster Vestment, a chasuble believed to be from Richard’s royal wardrobe. Tradition says it was worn by the Benedictine monks of Westminster Abbey during Richard’s reign.In the medieval rite of reburial, before re-interment the person’s remains were placed in the church while its usual pattern of worship continued, according to a March 25 press release posted on Welby’s website.This same pattern was being followed in the cathedral this week: they were in repose until March 26 when they were re-interred.BBC News reported that more than 35,000 people lined the streets in parts of Leicester March 22 to see the cortege bring the king’s remains to the cathedral. More than 20,000 people visited the cathedral to view the casket containing the king’s remains, the news service said. Viewing times were extended on March 24 and 25 to accommodate the crowds, according to the King Richard in Leicester website.People in the streets of Leicester tossed white roses on his casket on its way to the Leicester Cathedral. Richard was the head of the House of York, which had the white rose as its symbol. Photo: King Richard in Leicester websiteThe lead-lined casket, bearing the inscription “Richard III 1452-1485,” was designed and made of English oak and English yew by Michael Ibsen, a Canadian-born cabinetmaker whose DNA helped identify the remains of King Richard III. Ibsen is a 17th-generation descendant of Richard’s older sister, Anne of York. He has attended the week’s services in Leicester.A pall designed by artist Jacquie Binns covers the casket during the public viewings. Photo: King Richard in Leicester websiteArtist Jacquie Binns designed a black pall for the casket that is decorated with embroidered images of a knight in armor; King Richard’s queen in heraldic robes; the faces of archaeologists Sir Peter Soulsby and Richard Buckley, Philippa Langley (a screenwriter who instigated the search for the king’s remains) and the Very Rev. David Monteith, the dean of Leicester, among others. It was draped over the casket by the descendants of four peers who fought both for and against Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth in August 1485, according to the Leicester Mercury newspaper.Six days of liturgies and celebrations will end March 27 with a “Service of Reveal of the Tomb and Celebration for King Richard III” (order of service here) at noon local time followed by a series of celebratory events taking place in and around the cathedral quarter, Leicester Glows featuring more than 8,000 small fires around Jubilee Square and Cathedral Gardens, illuminating the area with “fire sculptures” and culminating in a fireworks display from the cathedral roof.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA center_img Tom Dahlman says: English king’s remains reburied after 530 years Week-long pageantry in Leicester draws to close with liturgy and firework Submit an Event Listing By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 26, 2015 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Archbishop of Canterbury Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ Michael Grear says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA April 9, 2015 at 8:13 am Had Richard been given the typical honors due a King at his death, the Archbishop of Canterbury would have officiated his funeral. It makes sense that the current Archbishop would preside at Richard’s re-internment. Richard was not a modern day Roman Catholic, Richard was a part of the Church Catholic. The modern day Roman Catholic Church would be just as unrecognizable to Richard as the Anglican, as both are the products of the Reformation or the Catholic counter reformation. Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags Rector Belleville, IL Comments are closed. Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH last_img read more

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