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Report Finds Weather Will Delay Demand Across Global Nutrient Markets

first_img Previous articleDuPont Pioneer Agronomy Update with Ryan PielNext articleEPA Proposes RFS Amendments Andy Eubank Facebook Twitter SHARE SHARE Report Finds Weather Will Delay Demand Across Global Nutrient Markets fertilizer restock issuesThe Rabobank Food and Agribusiness Research and Advisory Group recently put out a report about the cool, wet conditions in much of the Midwest – and concerns regarding future weather delaying the normal cycle of fertilizer restocking. Sterling Liddell is the Senior Vice President of the RaboBank group that released the findings.“As we looked at what’s happening globally and domestically we see a number of issues that have been developing. Most of them don’t have much to do with the amount of supply, but the capability of moving that supply into the appropriate areas. When we look at all three of the nutrients there appears to be ample supply coming out of production, however moving it, especially in North America has been a challenge because of river issues and also very wet spring that has delayed field work and and activity.”The report goes on to show the fast-approaching Northern Hemisphere planting season will be pivotal in driving short-term agri-commodity prices. Across South America – all eyes are on the weather as planting of winter crops continues.Rabobank’s outlook for urea for Quarter Two of 2013 is neutral to negative.“Urea has really begun to wane. There are several factors globally that are affecting this. There was some higher dollar purchases out of the Black Seas area earlier, however that’s looking more and more like a high end purchase. The Middle East has had an ample supply coming out of its production. In addition India has held off in doing a new urea tender, and the estimate is that they have enough urea stocks to put them into early June, so expecting another tender out of India as well. But all this together is causing downward pressure on at least international prices of urea.”The report also took into account phosphate and potash prices which are currently experiencing some downward pressure according to Liddell. Supplies of both are ample right now.Source: Ohio Ag Net By Andy Eubank – May 22, 2013 Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Report Finds Weather Will Delay Demand Across Global Nutrient Marketslast_img read more

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RWB encourages Honduras to step up efforts to combat impunity

first_imgNews RSF_en HondurasAmericas 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies April 27, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders hails the life sentences that a Tegucigalpa court passed on 11 June on three men for radio presenter Alfredo Villatoro’s abduction and murder in 2012. While the sentences constitute an advance in the fight against impunity, RWB urges the authorities to establish effective measures to protect journalists.The three men – Marvin Alonso Gómez and two brothers, Osman Fernando and Edgar Francisco Osorio Argujo – were convicted on 24 March of “aggravated abduction.” Kidnapped from his home on 9 May 2012, Villatoro was found dead near Tegucigalpa eight days later.In another encouraging development for freedom of information, the Honduran parliament approved a bill for the protection of journalists on first reading on 4 June. Although the text of the bill has not yet been made public, it provides for a mechanism for protecting human rights defenders, judicial officials, journalists and “social communicators” (community media, bloggers and netizens).“We welcome the sentences passed on Villatoro’s murders and we hope this bill will help to prevent such crimes from recurring,” said Camille Soulier, the head of the Reporters Without Borders Americas desk. “We encourage the Honduran authorities to include civil society, especially human rights groups, as much as possible in the discussion of this bill.”The protection mechanism will have two aspects, one preventive and one for protecting those in danger. The measures include monitoring by mobile phone network or satellite, camera installation, the loan of bulletproof vests and assigning bodyguards.These measures are long overdue in Honduras, which has one of the world’s highest murder rates and where journalists are often the targets of threats and violence.In one of the latest cases, Miguel Callejas, a city hall official in the northwestern city of Cholomas, threatened to kill local TV journalist Alex Sabillón on 16 June. The presenter of the programme Hechos de Choloma on Multicanal TV, Sabillón often covers murders in the region. Callejas told Sabillón he was not impressed by the police bodyguards he had been assigned. “I don’t give a damn that you have policemen with you, you son of bitch, we are going to kill you,” he said. Callejas has threatened and insulted Sabillón in the past and, on 23 May, unidentified individuals went to Sabillón’s home to photograph him. Reporters Without Borders hopes that the existing judicial provisions will be able to provide Sabillón will real protection and ensure that these threats are punished.RWB also hopes that the proposed new law takes account of all news and information providers, including those working for community media, who are often the targets of threats and violence, especially when defending indigenous rights and campaigns to recover land.The antenna of Puca Opalaca, a community radio station based in the eastern Intibucá region that is an offshoot of the Civic Council of Honduran Popular and Indigenous Organizations (COPINH), was damaged on 30 May.La Voz de Zacate Grande, a community radio that is the mouthpiece of the Zacate Grande Land Recovery Movement in the south of the country, was forcibly closed by 300 military policemen on 3 June 2010 for the alleged illegal occupation of land owned by Miguel Facussé Barjum, a businessman that the station has often accused of abuses. He is on the Reporters Without Borders list of “predators of press freedom.”Honduras is ranked 129th out of 180 countries in the 2014 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. News HondurasAmericas Follow the news on Honduras News Help by sharing this information center_img Reports Receive email alerts RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” Organisation May 13, 2021 Find out more June 19, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 RWB encourages Honduras to step up efforts to combat impunity to go further RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America December 28, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Union to rip up own rulebook

first_imgThe rules of the Oxford Union are set for a radical overhaul after sweeping changes to the society’s rulebook were revealed this week.The reforms were being billed as the most fundamental changes to the Union’s rulebook, which currently runs to over 127 pages, in more than a decade.Members of the debating society were due to vote on the changes at Thursday night’s debate on the American election, with the proposals expected to pass comfortably.The list of reformed rules includes the infamous Rule 33, which sets down strict campaigning guidelines for those running in the Society’s elections. The rule essentially outlaws canvassing, stating that those running for election cannot publicise their candidacy apart from telling their “close personal friends.”Controversy over the campaigning rules reached its peak a year ago, when the Society’s former Treasurer, Krishna Omkar, was elected as President in the Michaelmas elections only to be subsequently disqualified by an Election Tribunal and banned from ever running for election again, triggering a scandal that grabbed headlines around the world.Ten months on, President Josh Roche announced the list of drafted changes during a press conference on Tuesday, saying he was confident that they would be passed handsomely when proposed to members.“I have three key aims: better running of the Society, better service to its members, and a better image,” he said. “I am incredibly excited by these changes.”He added that he hoped rewriting the rules would help boost the Society’s reputation in light of recent events.“I know that in some quarters the Union has a bad image,” he said. “Some people believe that the Union can and will never change.“This is our response; not in words but in deeds and on paper.”A spokesman for the Oxford Union Society said, “We’ve essentially torn up the rulebook and started from scratch.The proposed alterations to the Society’s electoral system are just one feature of a massive overhaul of the institution this term, with a re-introduction of ‘College Secretaries’ to improve links with Junior Common Rooms, a Members Survey and workshops for women all in the pipeline.“I am confident that by the end of this term the Oxford Union will be in better condition than ever to meet the expectations of its Members.”Reaction by members to the rule changes, has so far been cautiously optimistic.Nick Coxon, a second year student at Wadham, said that he backed the changes but was unsure whether they would change the culture of the Union.“The reforms are smart and they make sense,” said the PPEist. “But this should have happened a long time ago. For now, the Union is and remains an elitist institution.”last_img read more

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Umphrey’s McGee Welcomes Main Squeeze’s Corey Frye, Debuts Misfits Cover At Stone Pony [Watch]

first_imgLast night, Umphrey’s McGee returned to the glorious outdoor venue, The Stone Pony SummerStage, for an unabashed night of rock and roll. Living up to the classic “Never Miss A Sunday Show” adage, the band packed their performance with tons of great originals, covers, teases and more! The show’s first big highlight was a sit in from Corey Frye, the lead singer of The Main Squeeze. Frye joined the fray and lent his vocals to a cover of thr Black Sabbath song, “War Pigs.”Check out video of “Sabbath > War Pigs” below, courtesy of Kyle Miller on YouTube.The show also featured a “Liberty Echo” with a “Roundabout” tease, a great “Robot World” second set opener that featured a “Jimmy Stewart” with lyrics, and a great “Gulf Stream” which quoted “Can’t You See.” The second set also featured “End Of The Road,” which you can watch below.The band wasn’t done with their great performance, as they worked in a debut cover of Misfits’ “Last Caress” in the encore, before closing out the whole performance with “Attachments.” What a weekend! Watch the video below, courtesy of Paul Giza.Check out the full All Things Umphrey’s setlist, posted below.Setlist: Umphrey’s McGee at The Stone Pony, Asbury Park, NJ – 7/17/16Set 1: Plunger > Turn & Dub > Words, Puppet String > Yoga Pants, Loose Ends, Black Sabbath > War Pigs[1], Liberty Echo[2] > Puppet StringSet 2: Robot World[3] > Hindsight, End of the Road, Pay the Snucka, Miami Virtue > Get In The Van, Ringo, Believe the Lie, Gulf Stream[4]Encore: Last Caress[5], Attachments[1] with Corey Frye on vocals[2] with Roundabout (Yes) tease[3] “Jimmy Stewart” with lyrics[4] with Can’t You See (The Marshall Tucker Band) quote[5] debut, MisfitsSupport: The Main SqueezePhotos by Bahram Foroughi. Full Gallery: Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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8 Pictures That Make the Case Against the FirstEnergy Bailout in Ohio

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享John Funk for the Cleveland Plain Dealer (Cleveland.com):Cheap natural gas for years to come plus a continuing surge in construction of wind and solar power plants because of decreasing costs means FirstEnergy’s bet on keeping its fleet of coal-fired and nuclear power plants — by shifting the risk to customers — is a $4 billion loser for customers, say analysts with the Cleveland-based Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, or IEEFA.FirstEnergy says that natural gas won’t stay cheap for long but refuses to reveal its gas price projections, which it made two years ago. The company hints it may have to close it largest Ohio-based coal plant, the W.H. Sammis plant, on the Ohio River, and its Davis-Besse nuclear plant near Toledo if it doesn’t get what it is asking for. Competitors and PJM, the company that manages the grid from Ohio to Washington, D.C., are opposed to FirstEnergy’s plan. See IEFFA’s main arguments in the following slides from the study.The W.H. Sammis power plant on the Ohio River is FirstEnergy’s last coal-fired power plant in Ohio. The company spent $1.8 billion upgrading the plant’s pollution controls after settling a Justice Department suit in federal court. Sammis has trouble competing against gas-fired power plants.Full article: Higher Energy Bills? Here Could Be Reasons Why 8 Pictures That Make the Case Against the FirstEnergy Bailout in Ohiolast_img read more

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Landslide kills two in West Sumatra

first_imgTopics : Dodi said the landslide was caused by the heavy rains that had been falling since Saturday evening.The landslide damaged 10 houses, including four with “severe damage”, with 21 survivors reported. A heavy downpour caused a landslide on Sunday in Guguak Malalo, a collection of villages in Tanah Datar regency, West Sumatra, claiming two lives and destroying homes.The fatal victims have been identified as a 75-year-old woman, Bainar, and her 45-year-old son. Ijun, said emergency head Dodi Susilo of the Tanah Datar Disaster Mitigation Agency.The mother and son were found buried in mud near the ruins of theiir house at around 1:30 p.m., nine hours after the landslide hit the area at 4:30 a.m.last_img read more

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LAUSD bus driver shortage

first_imgSchool leaders are scrambling to find dozens of bus drivers in the face of a shortage that could mean route delays and affect transportation for thousands of students. The district, which serves the transportation needs of about 70,000 students, has to cover anywhere from 200 to 250 routes daily because of illness, vacation or a backlog in hiring. So far, interruptions to the bus schedules have been minimal, with a relatively small number of delays, but the district wants to fill positions before it becomes a bigger problem. In addition, the four companies that contract with the district for transportation services – Laidlaw Education Services, Atlantic Express, Durham and Student First/Cardinal – have been unable to fully staff the buses, and the district has had to step in to fill their vacancies, which has exacerbated the issue. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake “The burden of getting LAUSD students to school falls on us, and for that reason, to get our own absences covered and that of contractor absences is becoming a challenge on a daily basis,” said David Palmer, deputy director of transportation for LAUSD. “There’s been a slight increase over the last several years, but this year, the great problem we’re experiencing is contractors are not fully staffed, and it’s straining to cover our own routes as well as the contractors’ routes.” The district, which serves 2,100 routes, is looking to fill 100 openings, which pay anywhere from $13.95 to $24.20 per hour depending on the type of bus. The district is looking at training new drivers and hiring qualified drivers to increase the pool for their transportation needs. But whenever a school district experiences a shortage and looks to hire qualified drivers from a limited pool, it ends up affecting the companies that contract with them, who are already having a hard time finding drivers. The district pays drivers a little bit more and offers benefits, so the contractors will certainly take a hit when LAUSD starts hiring, said Liz Sanchez from Laidlaw Education Services. “What’ll end up happening is if they hire some of our people and we can’t cover that work, then those same people are going to cover that work. It’s a vicious cycle,” said Sanchez, vice president-general manager of the company. “We plan for it as much as we can by pumping up training and recruiting to fill the positions of people leaving to go to LAUSD. This is a practice done for years.” For the past several years, the number of available drivers in Southern California has declined – a trend many in the business attribute to a strong economy. Historically, the part-time, entry-level job experiences a decrease in applicants wanting to enter the profession when the economy is doing well. “When the economy is good, usually this is what happens because it’s a part-time job and it’s a tough job,” Sanchez said. The district has seen drivers leave to drive buses for the city, airport shuttles and UPS, Palmer said. Qualified drivers and people interested in receiving training can call the district at (323) 342-1380. If a school bus does not arrive within 15 minutes of the regularly scheduled pickup time, LAUSD’s Palmer urges parents and students to call (800) 522-8737 to find out the status of the bus. Naush Boghossian, (818) 713-3722 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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African languages in SA courts

first_imgThe Supreme Court of Appeal inBloemfontein, South Africa’s judicialcapital city.Image: Graeme Williams,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more freephotos, visit the image library.Wilma den HartighThe Zwelitsha Magistrate’s Court in the Eastern Cape recently joined the ranks of other indigenous language courts in South Africa when it committed itself to hearing cases in isiXhosa.English and Afrikaans have always been dominant languages in the courtroom, often at the expense of South Africa’s other official languages. The practical difficulties of using all 11 languages in court have in the past been offered as an excuse for the continued use of English.Now KwaZulu-Natal, the Western Cape and Limpopo are the leading provinces to introduce indigenous language courts in the country. The first indigenous language court at Msinga in KwaZulu-Natal has been operating since the beginning of March. In Mitchell’s Plain in the Western Cape a court is hearing cases in Afrikaans and in Khayelitsha isiXhosa is used. In Limpopo a court in Sekhukhune is hearing cases in Sepedi.Professor Hennie van Coller, head of the Afrikaans Department at the University of the Free State, commended the justice system for introducing indigenous language courts.“Using a language in a court is one of the most important and effective ways to keep a language alive and restore its status,” he said.Department of Justice spokesperson Zolile Nqayi said the new language policy is twofold: to develop a culture of understanding, tolerance and dialogue in courts and to improve the delivery of justice. Many courts have significant backlogs and hearing cases in indigenous languages will hopefully speed up cases.Nqayi said that where one of the parties in an indigenous language court did not speak the language, the case would be heard in English. But in places like Zwelitsha, where 90% of the population including the magistrate and all court officials speak isiXhosa, the language policy has helped speed up the wheels of justice.Research has indicated that the use of interpreters can also lengthen court proceedings. In diverse communities such as Hillbrow, some cases can be conducted in four languages. In such cases every word by witnesses, accused persons, magistrates and attorneys must be translated four times.Interpreters may also get in the way of justice. Van Coller said the use of interpreters can often be harmful to cases as the accounts of the accused or witnesses are often loosely translated and not accurate.“There is a real need for good translation services,” he said. “Translators need good training to understand and interpret legal jargon. This is a very specific skill.”Nqayi added that indigenous language practices will initially be limited to magistrate’s courts. The reasoning is that all cases heard in magistrate’s courts are automatically subject to review by the high court. When cases go for review or on appeal to the high court, the transcript will be translated into English.Julia Mabjana from the Wits Language School added that South African businesses and tertiary institutions are also making an effort to promote the use of other languages. Many companies are sponsoring staff members to learn an indigenous language. At most tertiary institutions staff members are encouraged to learn the indigenous language of the area.Mabjana added that many provincial government departments’ employees are learning sign language. “This has made it possible to offer a much better service to the deaf community,” she said.Useful linksDepartment of Justice and Constitutional Development Constitutional Court Supreme Court of Appeal Legal Aid Boardlast_img read more

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Ohio’s record rainfall leaving some farmers on the sidelines

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest During the wettest yearlong period in Ohio since 1895, the state is lagging the furthest behind in planting corn and soybeans compared to all states that plant the crops, according to experts from The Ohio State University and federal reports.From June 1, 2018, to May 31, 2019, average rainfall across Ohio totaled 52 inches, which is about 10 inches above the mean for that period in the last decade, said Aaron Wilson, climate specialist for Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).“We’ve had very wet soils for a very long time,” Wilson said.As a result, only 50% of Ohio’s corn crop and 32% of its soybean crop was planted by June 9, a report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows. By now, Ohio typically is 96% done with planting corn and 89% done with soybeans.A brief slowdown in rainfall during the week of June 3 sent more Ohio corn and soybean growers out into their fields to plant, but that likely will prove to be only a temporary reprieve. The next two weeks are expected to bring above-average rainfall in the state, with the heaviest amounts in southern Ohio, Wilson said.“We’re going to return to a more saturated pattern,” he said.The growers who have been able to plant a corn or soybean crop likely will have to contend with other challenges that come with a lot of rainfall: more weeds, pests, and diseases.“Right now, you see a lot of really tall weeds already,” Wilson said.Farmers who planted wheat and forages, such as alfalfa, have noted poorer conditions of these crops also due to the weather, he said.“No one is really escaping challenges this year,” Wilson said.For those planting corn in June, yield losses are likely—even if the grower has switched to a shorter-season variety, said Peter Thomison, a corn field specialist with CFAES. The losses hinge on growing conditions after planting, but they could be more than 50% for some farmers, he said.The bulk of Ohio’s corn and soybean acres are typically planted by May 25 each year, with corn being finished earlier in the month.For growers planting soybeans, there’s still time, but some loss in yields should be expected, said Laura Lindsey, a soybean specialist with CFAES.Soybeans planted in late June produced yields that were 20% to 40% lower than soybeans planted by mid-May, Lindsey said, referring to data from research plots. Yield loss from delayed planting depends a lot on growing conditions the remainder of the year, Lindsey said.“I keep hearing farmers say they need just two days in a row or three days in a row of dry weather, and they haven’t been able to get that.”To view the USDA report comparing states’ crop progress, visit https://www.nass.usda.gov/Publications/Todays_Reports/reports/prog2419.pdf.last_img read more

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